Submitted abstracts

Nr Abstract submitter's e-mail addressI wish to presentMy abstract topic isAbstract titleAbstract authorsAbstract text (max 1500 characters)
1 katarina.patriksson@hv.sean oral presentationNeonatal careImmigrant parents' experiences of communicating with healthcare professionals at the neonatal unitKatarina Patriksson RN, PhD. Senior lecture University West, 46132 Trollhättan, Sweden Tfnnr; +46703824018 email; katarina.patriksson@hv.seTitle: Immigrant parents' experiences of communicating with healthcare professionals at the neonatal unit Background: Parent’s ability to actively participate in their child’s care is dependent on the healthcare professional’s ability to communicate and support them in caring activities Objectives: To examine parents’ experiences of communication with healthcare professionals when language barriers are present. Method: Twenty interviews were conducted with families who spoke Arabic and had a child who had been cared for at one of five neonatal care units in western Sweden. The same interpreter was used in all interviews, regardless of hospital site. The interviews were analysed using a phenomenological hermeneutic approach. Results: The main theme, having the opportunity to exercise one’s parental role, included four themes encountering emotional warmth, parents experiencing emotional warmth from the healthcare professional. Feeling accepted, parents expressed a desire to make themselves understood and communicated with the healthcare professional through an interpreter. Encountering a lack of understanding, when communication between parents and a healthcare professional could only occur through an interpreter, there was a risk of misunderstanding. Compensating for inadequate language skills, when language barriers existed, parents had to find alternative ways to communicate. Conclusion: It is not only language barriers that affect communication between parents and healthcare professionals; different expectations and pre-understandings are also of importance.
2 a.c.dejong@amsterdamumc.nlan oral presentationResearch in Children and Young PeopleMonitoring of micturition and bladder volumes can replace routine indwelling urinary catheters in children receiving intravenous opioids: a prospective cohort studyAuthors Anita C. de Jong,1* Jolanda M. Maaskant,2 Luitzen A. Groen,3 Job B. M. van Woensel1 Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, Emma Children’s Hospital, Amsterdam UMC, University of Amsterdam, DD Amsterdam, the Netherlands, Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Amsterdam UMC, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands Department of Pediatric Urology, Emma Children’s Hospital, Amsterdam UMC, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands * Email: a.c.dejong@amsterdamumc.nlIntroduction Great variation exists in the routine placement or maintenance of indwelling urinary catheters in children receiving intravenous (IV) opioids. Objectives To evaluate the incidence, risk factors and the time to event of urinary retention in children receiving IV opioids. Methods Prospective observational cohort study. Urinary retention was confirmed with ultrasound scans. Results In total, 207 opioid episodes were evaluated, of which 199 (96.1%) concerned morphine, in 187 children admitted to the pediatric ward or pediatric intensive care unit. The median age was 7.6 years (IQR 0.9–13.8), and 123 (59.4%) were male. The incidence of urinary retention was 31/207 (15.0%) opioid episodes, in which 14/32 (43.8%) patients received sedation for mechanical ventilation and 17/175 (9.7%) received no sedation. Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed a significant association with sedation (OR 6.8, 95% CI 2.7–17.4, p 0.001) and highest daily fluid intake (OR 0.8 per 10% deviation of normal intake, 95% CI 0.7–0.9, p 0.01). Opioid dosage, age and gender were not significantly associated. The median time to event was 9.0 h (IQR 7.1–13.3) since the initiation of IV opioids. Most events (28/31, 90.3%) occurred within the first 24 h. Discussion Strengths: size of the study population and confirmatory ultrasound scans. Limitations: due the low incidence of urinary retention, we were limited to a multivariable analysis of three variables. Conclusions The incidence of urinary retention in children receiving intravenous opioids is low, indicating that placement of maintenance of urinary catheters is not routinely necessary in these patients. However, micturition and bladder volumes must be monitored, especially in sedated children and during the first 24 h of opioid administration.
3 andrea.gazzelloni@opbg.netan oral presentationChild health promotionNursing students and child health promotion: a pre-post intervention study about hand hygiene in a primary school in Rome (Italy)Gazzelloni Andrea, School of Nursing Tutor, Bambino Gesù Children’s Hospital, andrea.gazzelloni@opbg.net, ITALY (Rome) Pizziconi Valentina, School of Nursing Tutor, Bambino Gesù Children’s Hospital, valentina.pizziconi@opbg.net, ITALY (Rome) Adriani Luca, Emergency Room Nurse, Bambino Gesù Children’s Hospital, luca.adriani@opbg.net, ITALY (Rome) Stella Valentina, Second year nursing student, University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, vale.stella1928@gmail.com, ITALY (Rome) Simioli Valentina, Second year nursing student, University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, valentinasimioli98opbg@gmail.com, ITALY (Rome) D’Elpidio Giuliana, School of Nursing Director, Bambino Gesù Children’s Hospital, giuliana.delpidio@opbg.net, ITALY (Rome)INTRODUCTION Cleaning hands at the right times and in the right way can prevent infections. Hand hygiene have a strong impact on individual and community health. Child health promotion is crucial to establish healthy habits in the present and future community. Nursing students could be good healthy habits promoters for children. OBJECTIVES Teaching handwashing technique to primary school children. METHODS Second-year nursing students conducted a “pre-post” study to investigate children’s hand hygiene habits and teach them the handwashing technique with posters, practical session and a movement song. Parents gave their authorization. Anonymous structured pre-post questionnaires were administered. RESULTS 71 children (mean age 8 ys, SD±1.40, range 6-10 ys) were involved, 57% males and 43% females. Children wash their hands about 5 times/day (SD±2.56), 69% before eating, 69% after using toilets and 87% dry their hands. 82% of them knew handwashing as infection prevention, only 31% the 1-minute handwashing with soap and water recommendation and nobody the handwashing technique. After the intervention, knowledge improved about infection prevention (93%), the 1-minute handwashing recommendation (90%) and the correct technique (40%). DISCUSSION Information about handwashing was poor but after the intervention knowledge were improved. CONCLUSIONS Hand hygiene habits need to be enforced and nursing students could contribute effectively in promoting these healthy habits in childhood.
4 marimyntt@gmail.coman oral presentationResearch in Children and Young PeopleAdolescents´ use of alcohol and related responsibilities – qualitative interview studyMari Mynttinen, RN, MNSc, Doctoral candidate, University of Turku, mari.mynttinen(at)utu.fi, Finland Kaisa Mishina, University teacher, senior researcher, University of Turku, kaisa.mishina(at)utu.fi, Finland Mari Kangasniemi, Adjunct professor, PhD, University researcher, University of Turku, mari.kangasniemi(at)utu.fi, FinlandABSTRACT Background Research focusing on responsibilities in adolescents´ use of alcohol is scarce although the knowledge could be useful in supporting them in their responsibilities. Aim To describe adolescents´ perceptions and experiences of their use of alcohol and related responsibilities. Design and methods This study used a qualitative descriptive method carrying out 19 semi-structured focus group interviews (n=87) with adolescents aged 14–16 years in Finland in 2017. The data was analysed using inductive content analysis. Results Responsibilities referred to adolescents´ taking care of themselves, involving in peers´ alcohol use and skills for considered, moderate and self-controlled drinking. Considerations of benefits and disadvantages of alcohol use included in growing towards responsible citizens. Adolescents emphasized parental involvement as the main responsibility when parents´ take care of adolescents, that could be missing in some cases. Characteristics of successful and ineffective support for adolescents´ use of alcohol were described. Discussion The findings provide adolescents´ perspectives to increase understanding about their alcohol use and related responsibilities for preventive health services. The perceptions of parents´ disregard for adolescents´ alcohol use, and the ways to support adolescents in their responsibilities require further attention. Conclusion Future research in alcohol use and related responsibilities to improve adolescents´ health is recommended.
5 schmidt.ljudmila2017@gmail.coma poster presentationChild health promotion„School nurses’ experience in the prevention of overweight: a qualitative research in general education schools in Tartu and Tallinn“Ljudmila Schmidt - School nurse, Tartu Kivilinna School, schmidt.ljudmila2017@gmail.com, Estonia Kadri Kööp - Lecturer, Tallinn Health Care College, koopkadri@gmail.com , Estonia Ere Uibu - Assistant of Nursing Science, University of Tartu, Institute of Family Medicine and Public Health ere.uibu@ut.ee , EstoniaOverweight of school-age children is a serious public health problem. The preventive work of school nurses contributes to reducing overweight among pupils and associated health risks. School nurses should counsel pupils and parents in questions of health-related behaviour but it is not known whether they counsel pupils in terms of preventing becoming overweight. The aim of this study was to describe the experiences of school nurses in preventing and counselling for overweight in general education schools in Tartu and Tallinn. Data were collected between September 2018 and December 2018, with 15 respondents participating in the research. The author used semi-structured interviews as the data collection method, and transcripts of interviews formed the material for the analysis. To analyse the data obtained, an inductive content analysis was carried out. The results of the research revealed that school nurses monitor the health of pupils, counsel pupils and parents for lifestyle issues, motivating them to exercise more and teaching healthy food choices to avoid gaining excessive weight and health problems. School nurses wish to cooperate more with teachers and expect more support from the school management when it comes to measures of overweight prevention in schools. School nurses found it to be important, during the consultation, to listen, support, encourage a pupil, while remaining helpful and friendly. As a barrier to lifestyle counselling, school nurses highlighted a lack of pupils’ interest in such advising, time pressure due to the high workload of school nurses as well as a shortage of the relevant knowledge or skills that school nurses feature. School nurses experience certain difficulties in communicating with those parents who are not eager to work with a school nurse. Besides, they admitted that it is difficult to help pupils without parental involvement. Based on the results of the research, it can be concluded that cooperation between school nurses and parents is essential to prevent overweight among pupils. In the future, it is also important to study the topic further from the point of view of schoolchildren and their parents, to find out what kind of counselling they need and what kind of help they require from school, and to create comprehensive understanding and strategy for tackling the problem of overweight among school-age children. Keywords: pupil, overweight, prevention, school nurse, lifestyle counselling
6 ayakca@ku.edu.tran oral presentationGlobal Challenges for caring for Children, Young People and FamiliesThe Effect of Childhood Traumatic Life on Parenting AttitudesDamla Ozcevik1, Aylin Akca Sümengen2, Ayfer Ekim3, Ayşe Ferda Ocakci1 1 Koc University School of Nursing, Istanbul, Turkey. 2 Bahcesehir University School of Health Sciences, Istanbul, Turkey. 3 Istanbul Bilgi University, Faculty of Health Sciences, Istanbul, Turkey.Introduction: Insight regarding the growth of the individual is an important factor in understanding the development of beliefs about parenting attitudes. Objective: The aim of this study; to investigate parental attitudes of mothers with traumatic experiences in terms of childhood abuse. Methods: This descriptive study was conducted with 355 mothers who had children in primary school. Research data: Personal Data Collection Form, Childhood Trauma Scale and Parenting Styles and Dimensions Questionnaire were collected with three forms. The data were evaluated with Independent t test, Kruskal-Wallis H test, ANOVA and correlation analysis. Results: The difference between the family type and the mothers' parenting attitudes was statistically significant (p =.025). It was found that there was a negative, moderate and significant relationship between the mean scores of childhood traumas and the Competent Parenting Styles (r=-0.37, p<.05). Discussion: As in our study, there are studies showing that parents who have traumatic experiences in childhood are more abused. The results of the studies indicate that the parent who is subjected to violence in their childhood applies the same things to their children. Conclusions: The traumatic experiences that are exposed in childhood leave deep traces in the child and may negatively affect mental health and parenting attitudes. Appropriate counseling and, if necessary, appropriate treatment should be provided to individuals found to be traumatized.
7 hhparn@gmail.coman oral presentationNeonatal careHow can nurses support parent-infant attachment of premature infants in the neonatal intensive care unit?Hanna Helena Pärn, RN MSc University of Southampton; Tartu University Hospital HannaHelena.Parn@kliinikum.ee EstoniaIntroduction, objectived: Attachment plays a vital role in the well-being of parents and especially preterm infants, who are most vulnerable to the effects of the environment. Nurses as constant care providers are in a favourable position to assist with attachment process.This study aims to critically review qualitative studies concerning parent-infant attachment and give an overview of the findings on how nurses can help facilitate this process. Method: Systematic search was conducted and articles identified through electronic databases. Four research articles were identified using inclusion-exclusion criteria and critically appraised. Results: Results were categorized into 4 themes that help facilitate attachment with the emphasis on communication, support, parents' autonomy and the surrounding environment. Discussion: Good communication, support and encouragement for parents; and teaching them aspects of care to shape them into autonomous carers, helps with attachment. Importance of interaction and skin-to-skin care with their preemie should be emphasised. As the environment in the NICU can be daunting for parents, nurses should provide comfort and privacy. Conclusion: The purpose of this review was to give an overview of qualitative studies on how nurses can support the formation of parent-infant attachment with premature infants in the NICU. The research indicates four main themes and several key factors that NICU nurses should aim to apply in their practice.
8 anette.lund@rsyd.dka poster presentationMental Health Children and Young People Nursing“The good interaction”Mette Thelborg,Clinical Nurse Specialist,MoPP, Mette.Thelborg@rsyd.dkAnette Lund, Development Nurse, Cand. Cur.Anette.Lund@rsyd.dkH.C. Andersen Children ́sHospital, OdenseUniversity Hospital, DenmarkIntroduction A study published by The Committee for Children in Denmark in 2017 points out, thatevery fifth child taking part in the study,experiences,that treatmentor therapy isgiven against the child ́s free will. Children report, that staff communicates with parents, and the information offered, is not always understood by the child. Consequently Hans Christian Andersen Children ́sHospital has implemented an evidence-based approach,“The good interaction”.ObjectivesThe program aims to promote, that children experienceinvolvement,well-being and growthdespite hospitalization, illness and disease. This calls for health professionals to gain advanced skills to be as qualified to interact and communicate with children, as they are trained treating the disease.MethodsThe participants receive training in the theoretical approach“Thegood interaction”.Video sequences,demonstrating an interaction between staffand a child in care, areanalyzed and included in training. Questionnaire is used to identify staff self-efficacy concerning interaction and communication. ResultsThe program contributes to increased self-efficacyamong staff as to interact and communicate with children. DiscussionThe program “The good interaction”is as also considered to be a tool to reduce restraint in pediatric care. Conclusions“The good interaction”seems to have an impact on staff ́s skills to interact and communicate.Studies exploring children’s perspective are required.
9 luigi.marotta@opbg.neta poster presentationMental Health Children and Young People NursingCLS-IT - COMMUNICATION AND LANGUAGE SCREENING IN INFANTS AND TODDLERSLuigi, Marotta, Speech and Language Therapist, Roma IRCCS Ospedale Pediatrico Bambino Gesù, luigi.marotta@opbg.net, Italy Silvia, Laudanna, Speech and Language Therapist, Roma Progetto Eirené Onlus, silvialaudanna@virgilio.it, Italy Elena, Pellegrini,Speech and Language Therapist, Viterbo, e.pellegrini.logopedista@gmail.com, Italy Simona, Latini, Paediatric Nurse Practitioner, Roma IRCCS Ospedale Pediatrico Bambino Gesù,simona.latini@opbg.net, Italy Andreina, Morocutti, Physiotherapist, Roma IRCCS Ospedale Pediatrico Bambino Gesù, andreina.morocutti@opbg.net, ItalyIntroduction: In paediatric settings, physicians and nurses perform physical examinations on infants and toddlers as a routine. However, the assessment of language and communicative skills is not always foregone as well. Objectives: This work aims to introduce a time-efficient and easy to administrate by Paediatric Nurse Practitioners screening protocol for Communication and Language skills in Infants and Toddlers (CLS-IT). Methods: The protocol consists of two tools, exploring lexical and communicative skills: the Italian adaptation of the MacArthur-Bates CDI (Caselli et al. 2015) and the ASCB questionnaire (Bonifacio et al. 2013). Results: The procedure could enable an higher level of interaction with the patients and a chance to intercept earlier any linguistic and communication impairments. We will present the first results of the pilot study. Discussion: At the time of the first admission you should collect as much information as possible about the child and caregivers, also concerning his cognitive, linguistic, communicative and social skills to increase the appropriateness and sustainability of clinical interventions, and a great opportunity to optimize resources in a time of financial crisis. Conclusions: An appropriate reception of the children and their families by the health team is at the basis of the process of taking charge. The interaction among the various professionals is therefore indispensable.
10 tennsalm@rm.dkan oral presentationNeonatal careTo become a family in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit - parents´experiences of staying together with their infant in a family room in the Neonatal Intensive care Unit (NICU).Tenna Gladbo Salmonsen, RN, NIDCAP professional., MScN, Department of Paediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark. Hanne Aagaard, RN, MScN, PHD, NIDCAP professional, Associate Professor, Lovisenberg diaconal University College, Norge & part time lecture, Institute and Public Health, Health, Aarhus University, DenmarkIntroduction: Admission at the NICU begins with separation between the parents and the infant, which is often related to uncertainty, distress and challenge early transition of becoming a family. Objectives: To investigate parents’ experiences of living in a family-room together with their infant. Methods: A hermeneutic phenomenological approach was applied. Data was collected through semi-structured interviews during the family admission at NICU. A thematic analysis was carried out inspired by Max Van Manen. Results: The analysis revealed four themes: “Continuity and safety are mutual preconditions”, “the family-room - worth waiting for”, “the parents lifeblood - a job for the nurses” and “to feel left to ones own devices” Discussion: To be together as a family strengthens developing of the parenthood. A close relationship between parents and nurses is important to increase the parents trust and how the parents feel and experience themselves as parents. In a family focused perspective, the protection of the parents’ autonomy deserves high attention. Having the possibility to contact the nursing staff increase the parents’ self-confidence, responsibility and increase the experiences of being a family, and see themselves as `real´ parents. Conclusions: Staying in a family-room increase the establishment of family formation process and the bonding between the parents and the infant. The relationship between parents and nurses affects parents’ perception of themselves as parents.
11 daniela.zampieri@opbg.neta poster presentationNutritionFeeding behaviour assessment questionnaire: emotional-relational, behavioural and meal structure aspectsRosalia Bonomo,freelance speech therapist in Rome, lia.liabonomo@gmail.com, Italy. Daniela Zampieri,speech therapist, Ospedale Pediatrico Bambino Gesù S. Marinella, daniela.zampieri@opbg.net, Italy.Feeding behaviour assessment questionnaire: emotional-relational, behavioural and meal structure aspects R. Bonomo* e D. Zampieri^ *freelance speech therapist in Rome,lia.liabonomo@gmail.com,Italy. ^speech therapist Ospedale Pediatrico Bambino Gesù S. Marinella,daniela.zampieri@opbg.net, Italy. ABSTRACT Introduction:feeding disorders in children include a heterogeneous group of clinical condition, which often have important consequences on the emotional and relational aspects within the parent-child dyad. Objectives: the purpose of this work is to develop a feeding behaviour assessment questionnaire, which helps the clinician to analyse the emotional, relational and behavioural aspects of the meal. Methods: the questionnaire consists of 24 questions that refer to three different aspects: affective and relational, behavioural and meal structure. The caregiver fills out the questionnaire providing an answer referred to a range from "0 = never" to "3 = always". Results:once the sample has been defined and the data collected from the questionnaire have been processed, the reference normative values will be defined. Discussion: the analysis of the results of the questionnaire directs the clinician to apply a focused parent counseling, that can improve the treatment and quality of life of the child. Conclusions: this work can provide important support in the management of paediatric feeding disorders, also taking into consideration the emotional and relational aspects.
12 piabonni@rm.dkan oral presentationChronic diseases and Complex NeedsParents´ experience when their child diagnosed with cystic fibrosis at newborn screeningPia Bonde Nielsen, Staff Development Nurse, Aarhus University Hospital, Department of Paediatrics and Adolescent Medicine - Unit for Research and Development i Nursing for Children and Young People, Piabonni@rm.dk, DenmarkIntroduction: Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a chronic, serious and life-threatening disease. Since May 2016, screening for CF has been part of the newborn screening program in Denmark. This has led to a fundamental different patient continuity of care, as the parents now get the positive result for the screening by telephone, while the newborn child seems healthy. Objective: The aim of this study was to gain knowledge about the parents' experiences with the everyday-life after having a child diagnosed with CF. Methods: The study takes a phenomenological-hermeneutical approach. Semi-structures interviews with parents to 17 newborn children were conducted and narrative analysis was used. Results: The analysis revealed five teams: Getting the diagnosis; the first meeting and the relationship with the cystic fibrosis specialist team; the families new everyday live after the diagnosis and the parents' anxiety and concern for the child's future. Discussion: The cystic fibrosis specialist team has fundamental importance for the parental ability to accept and cope with the diagnosis and the new living conditions. In a health care system under pressure with shorter and shorter contacts, it is important to know which elements are particularly important for the parents. Conclusions: This study has highlighted some important elements that healthcare professionals need to have focus on in the new patient continuity care for children with cystic fibrosis.
13 bmpoutopoulou@gmail.coma poster presentationChronic diseases and Complex NeedsQuality of life of children and adolescents with cystic fibrosisEffrosyni Vlachioti, Nurse MSc, PhD, Sector Coordinator, Children's Hospital 'Agia Sophia' , Athens, evlachioti@yahoo.gr, Greece Varvara Boutopoulou, Nurse MSc, PhD, RN, Academic Scholar University of Athens, bmpoutopoulou@gmail.com, Greece Despoina Koumpagioti, Nurse MSc, PhD, RN, Children's Hospital 'Aglaia Kyriakou', Athens, dkoumpagioti@nurs.uoa.gr, Greece Euanthia Konstantaki, Nurse MSc, PhD, evakonstantaki1@gmail.com, Greece Giannis Kasimis, Nurse MSc, PhD(c), jkassimis@hotmail.com, Greece Ioanna Loukou, MD, Children Pulmonologist, Cystic Fibrosis Department Coordinator, Children's Hospital 'Agia Sophia', Athens, ioannaloukou@gmail.com, Greece Matziou B, Professor of Pediatric Nursing University of Athens, vmatziou@nurs.uoa.gr, GreeceIntroduction: Cystic fibrosis is the most common fatal genetic disease among white race characterized by generalized dysfunction of exocrine glands. Patients suffer from progressively worsening symptoms, from respiratory and digestive system mainly, affecting their quality of life. Aim:Study aim was quality of life evaluation in children and adolescents with cystic fibrosis. Factors that may affect quality of life was studied as well. Methods:The study conducted in Children Hospital’s Cystic Fibrosis Department in Athens, Greece. Cystic Fibrosis Questionnaire – Related Quality of Life instrument was used in children and adolescents up to 17 years of age. Results:71 children and 35 adolescents with cystic fibrosis were questioned. There was a strong correlation between age and treatment constraints (p<0.001), eating disturbances (p=0.01), social limitations (p=0.002) and emotional state (p=0.003) in age group 6-11 years old. Statistical significance was found between age and physical functioning (p=0.035) for the same group. Significance was found between age and role limitations/school performance among adolescents (p=0.02). Conclusions: Quality of life in children and adolescents with cystic fibrosis is impaired due to the complexity and chronicity of the disease. Factors which affect quality of life in different group ages should be considered by multidisciplinary teams aiming at the best possible aoutcomes of these patients.
14 bmpoutopoulou@gmail.coma poster presentationInfectious diseasesEducational program for the reduction of central line associated bloodstream infectionsCharalampia Nteli, Nurse Msc, PhD, PICU Children's Hospital Aglaia Kyriakou, Athens, chnteli@nurs.uoa.gr, Greece Varvara Boutopoulou, Nurse MSc, PhD, RN, Academic Scholar Univerity of Athens, bmpoutopoulou@gmail.com, Greece Pantelis Perdikaris, Assistant Professor University of Peloponese, pantelisperdikaris@gmail.com, Greece Despoina Koumpagioti, Nurse MSc, PhD, Pediatric Hospital 'Aglaia Kiriakou', dkoumpagioti@nurs.uoa.gr, Greece Evanthia Konstantaki, Nurse MSc, PhD, evakonstanaki1@gmail.com, Greece Petros Galanis RN, MPH, PhD, Center for Health Services Management and Evaluation Faculty of Nursing University of Athens, pegalan@nurs.uoa.gr, Greece Vasiliki Matziou, Professor of Pediatric Nursing Univrsity of Athens, vmatziou@nurs.uoa.gr, GreeceIntroduction: Central line associated bloodstream infections (CLABSI) are a serious global health problem, with serious consequences for patients, families and health systems. CLABSI are the most common hospital infection causing significant complications such as increased mortality, length of hospitalization and care costs. AIM:Aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of insertion of central line (CL) care bundles in reducing CLABSI in a Greek PICU. METHODS:A prospective intervention study was conducted. Pediatric patients aged 15 days old to 14 years who admitted in PICU and had CL participated in the study. During post intervention period which lasted almost 1 year medical and nursing staff was trained on CLABSI control and prevention. RESULTS: In the pre-intervention period CLABSI was recorded in 14 of the 108 patients (12.96% of patients), 14 CLABSI per 1000 days of CL whilst in the post-intervention period CLABSI was recorded in 2 of the 43 patients (4.6% of patients), 4.8 CLABSI per 1000 days of CL. Overall after the intervention CLABSI decreased by 66%. Conclusions:CLABSI in ICUs can be largely prevented through simple and low cost measures. The important role of nurses in preventing CLABSIs is highlighted while implementing CLABSI prevention measures will help to significantly reduce CLABSI.
15 bmpoutopoulou@gmail.coma poster presentationNeonatal careFactors affecting NREM neonatal sleep in NICUsVarvara Boutopoulou, Nurse MSc, PhD, RN, Academic Scholar University of Athens, bmpoutopoulou@gmail.com, Greece Vasiliki Matziou, Professor of Pediatric Nursing University of Athens, vmatziou@nurs.uoa.gr, GreeceIntroduction:NREM sleep is the distinct stage of sleep during which essential brain functions related to neonates’ neurodevelopmental outcome, take place. The multisensory environment of Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) often interrupts or inhibits neonatal NREM affecting its quality and duration. AIM: The purpose of this study was to investigate the relation between noise and light levels in the NICU environment and NREM sleep duration. METHODS: Neonatal sleep was recorded through aEEG in three consecutive days. Recordings on the first day were under baseline conditions, the second day under sound intensity reduction, and the third day under light intensity reduction. RESULTS:Thirty-two neonates finally included in the study. When sound or light intensity was redused the duration of NREM sleep increased significantly (p<0.001, and p<0.001, respectively). No significant statistical differences were found in REM and total sleep duration among the 3 different days. CONCLUSIONS: Intense noise and light affect NREM sleep and may have detrimental effects on neurodevelopmental outcome of hospitalized neonates. Medical and nursing staff should be aware of the neonates’ needs for adequate and good-quality sleep and implement interventions to optimize NICU environment.
16 costanza.calabrese@opbg.neta poster presentationGlobal Challenges for caring for Children, Young People and FamiliesEducational project dedicated to school teachers for the correct management of epileptic seizures in school-age childrenTommaso Renzetti, nurse coordinator, Department of Neurosciences and Neurorehabilitation, Bambino Gesù Children’s Hospital, IRCCS, Rome. tommaso.renzetti@opbg.net Italy Costanza Calabrese, pediatric nurse, Department of Neurosciences and Neurorehabilitation, Bambino Gesù Children’s Hospital, IRCCS, Rome. costanza.calabrese@opbg.net Italy Nicola Pietrafusa, MD, PhD, Department of Neurosciences and Neurorehabilitation, Bambino Gesù Children’s Hospital, IRCCS, Rome. nicola1.pietrafusa@opbg.net Italy Ilaria Pannacci, nurse coordinator, Department of Neurosciences and Neurorehabilitation, Bambino Gesù Children’s Hospital, IRCCS, Rome. tommaso.renzetti@opbg.net Italy Raffaella Rainò, nurse, Department of Neurosciences and Neurorehabilitation, Bambino Gesù Children’s Hospital, IRCCS, Rome. raffaella.raino@opbg.net Italy Andrea Giuffrida, nurse, Department of Neurosciences and Neurorehabilitation, Bambino Gesù Children’s Hospital, IRCCS, Rome. andrea.giuffrida@opbg.net Italy Nicola Specchio, MD, PhD, Department of Neurosciences and Neurorehabilitation, Bambino Gesù Children’s Hospital, IRCCS, Rome. nicola.specchio@opbg.net Italy Federico Vigevano MD, PhD, Department of Neurosciences and Neurorehabilitation, Bambino Gesù Children’s Hospital, IRCCS, Rome. federico.vigevano@opbg.net ItalyObjective: Educate the school staff to correctly handle epileptic seizure increasing the safety of young people at school and promoting the administration of emergency drugs. Reduce hospitalization in ICU for prolonged uninterrupted crises in time and revolving doors in the hospital. Methods: Two-hour nurse training meetings with school staff dedicated to illustrating the illness and the correct handling of seizures. During meetings two questionnaires will be distributed: one ex ante for information on epilepsy, willingness to administer the drug and anxiety in facing crisis; and one ex post to control the knowledge acquired. After a year, we interviewed the trained teachers to ask them if and how they handled seizures in the school environment. A lot of data have shown increased understanding and reduction of the social stigma towards epilepsy. Results: We have held numerous meetings in Rome and the province and we have distributed 740 questionnaires between January 2016 and November 2018. From the analysis we highlighted an increase in knowledge of correct behavior to be taken during an epileptic crisis, a reduction in anxiety by 60% post and an increase in willingness to administer drug emerged until to 90%. From interviews 17 seizure emerged and only in 2 cases was admitted. Conclusions: Through a semi-structured interview to schools which have participated in the training, the project noticed a high efficacy by increasing the safety of children with epileptic seizures at school. Call to the emergency medical number decreased, and, as a consequence social cost lowered. Furthermore, it showed greatly reducing the revolving doors after one year of training, whit a significant increase in patients' quality of life.
17 Louise.Heywood@wales.nhs.uka poster presentationEthical issues in children and young peopleThis Is Me – Challenging Negative Attitudes Towards Children With Feeding TubesLouise heywood, paediatric Nutrition Nurse, Swansea Bay university Health Board, Louise.heywood@wales.nhs.uk WalesIntroduction There are several reasons why children require feeding tubes, such as neurological disorders and gastrointestinal disorders. Unfortunately many families have experienced problems with members of the public stigmatising their child with disrespectful comments and staring. Everyone has the right to be treated fairly and with dignity and respect, regardless of their age, gender, ethnic origin, sexual preference, economic status or religious beliefs (or non-beliefs). They have a right to be protected from harm or insult. (RCN Equality, Diversity and Rights) Objectives The objective of the project was to challenge negative attitudes by raising awareness and making an audio visual production. Method 85 families were invited to be part of the project. 12 families attended and photography and filming were undertaken. Additionally families unable to attend shared photos and videos of their children; all resources were utilised alongside musical accompaniment. Results The video was presented at Swansea Bay’s Childrens symposium, shared by the communications department and uploaded to social media. ITV evening news aired the video and interviewed several of the parents. To date these news videos have been viewed 112k times by the public. The video has received excellent feedback, and has challenged stigmatisation with education. Conclusion Many families have reported problems they’ve had in the community with people staring or saying rude things about their child due to them having a feeding tube. A video has been made to try and educate the public, showing how awesome these children are and although they have feeding tubes, they still lead normal, active lives. Children with feeding tubes should not be treated any different to any other child. Their feeding tubes are essential for their survival and these families need to be supported, not treated badly. Background There are several reasons why children require feeding tubes, such as neurological disorders and gastrointestinal disorders. Unfortunately many families have experienced problems with members of the public stigmatising their child with disrespectful comments and staring. Everyone has the right to be treated fairly and with dignity and respect, regardless of their age, gender, ethnic origin, sexual preference, economic status or religious beliefs (or non-beliefs). They have a right to be protected from harm or insult. (RCN Equality, Diversity and Rights) tubes such as an n Aim The aim of the project was to challenge negative attitudes by raising awareness and making an audio visual production. Method 85 families were invited to be part of the project. 12 families attended and photography and filming were undertaken. Additionally families unable to attend shared photos and videos of their children; all resources were utilised alongside musical accompaniment. Results The video was presented at Swansea Bay’s Childrens symposium, shared by the communications department and uploaded to social media. ITV evening news aired the video and interviewed several of the parents. To date these news videos have been viewed 112k times by the public. The video has received excellent feedback, and has challenged stigmatisation with education.
18 Rachel.Isaac1@wales.nhs.ukno preference, either oneNursing education and leadershipTripartite Hermeneutic Education – An empirical response to paediatric medication errorsRachel Isaac Paediatric Practice Development Nurse; Swansea Bay University Health Board Trust;Rachel.Isaac1@wales.nhs.uk; Wales United Kingdom Pramodh Vallabhaeni Consultant Paediatrician; Swansea Bay University Health Board Trust; Pramodh.Vallabhaeni@wales.nhs.uk; Wales United Kingdom Bhavee Patel Clinical Lead Paediatric Pharmacist; ; Swansea Bay University Health Board Trust;Bhavee.Patel@wales.nhs.uk; Wales United KingdomIntroduction Robust clinical governance measures consistently recorded high percentage of reported incidents related to paediatric medication errors in our department. This is in line with published evidence of increasing number of harmful incidents to patients through medication errors involving both prescription and administration errors. Objectives A novel tripartite alliance was formed between Medicine, Nursing and Pharmacology aimed to decrease medication errors. Methods PDSA audit cycle recorded the number, nature and severity of reported medication errors within the department. Errors were graded into categories as per the EQUIP study model. An education package was introduced, where all junior doctors were asked to complete an online module. Nursing competency packages were initiated and the Lead Pharmacist established a new education tool advocated by Meds IQ called ‘Druggles.’ A repeat audit was undertaken following the interventions. Results Compared with the pre-intervention data, where 89.3% of admitted patients had been subjected to errors, this value decreased to 12.1% after the intervention, with an estimated error reduction of 77.2%. There was a comparative 51.3% decrease in significant errors and a complete elimination of serious and potentially lethal errors. Discussion The inter-professional tripartite alliance, coupled with the adoption of a “zero-tolerance to errors” policy, have contributed to the success of our programme. Conclusion Hermeneutics facilitate the study of human phenomena within the cultural background it occurs. These principles have enabled the success of this project that can be implemented in other areas of multi-disciplinary working.
19 bmpoutopoulou@gmail.coma poster presentationChildren's surgeryParents' presence during induction of anaesthesiaThomas Ziakas, Head Nurse, MSc, PhD(c), Childrens’ Hospital IASO, Athens, thziakas@gmail.com, Greece. Varvara Boutopoulou, Nurse MSc, PhD, RN, Academic Scholar Univerity of Athens, bmpoutopoulou@gmail.com Eleni Georgiou, Nurse, Researcher, elenigeorgiou96@gmail.com, Greece Effrosyni Vlachioti, Nurse MSc, PhD, Sector Coordinator, Children's Hospital 'Agia Sophia', evlachioti@yahoo.gr, Greece Foteini Mavridi, Nurse MSc, PhD, Operation Depratment Childrens' Hospital 'P & A Kyriakou', mavfot@gmail.com, Greece Anastasia Karkani, Psychologist MSc, PhD, nastia.karkani@yahoo.gr, Greece Pantelis Perdikaris, Assistant Professor University of Peloponese, pantelisperdikaris@gmail.com, Greece Vasiliki Matziou, Professor of Pediatric Nursing University of Athens, vmatziou@nurs.uoa.gr, GreeceIntroduction:Child's admission to the hospital for surgery is a potentially traumatic experience for both child and parents. The most common reactions are fear, pain, anxiety. Aim:This review aims to inestigate the research evidence about the nessecity of parents' presence during induction of anaesthesia. Methods: Pubmed/Medline, Cochrane Library and Scopus were used. Key word combinations of 'postoperative anxienty', 'pediatric surgery' and 'parent presence' were applied. Results: Children and parents experienced less stress in the waiting room when they have received appropriate information in comparison with those who haven’t. Parental presence when introducing children to anaesthesia is an approach that can replace pre-medication. Parental presence seems to decrease significantly children’s and parents’ stress. Furthermore, studies have shown that parental presence contributes to maternal satisfaction and provides a framework of safety. Lately, researchers have shifted their focus on individual factors around parental presence such as the quality and duration of parental presence in preparing children and what parents can really do rather than just being or not during anaesthesia. Parental presence alone has been found to be effective in selected cases related to age levels and onset of child and parenting stress. Conclusions:Parents’ presence within a preoperative context is beneficial for children and parents' stress reduction.
20 matteo.amicucci@opbg.netno preference, either oneResearch in Children and Young PeopleACTIONS TO IMPLEMENT HEALTHCARE PROFESSIONAL RESEARCH IN THE PAEDIATRIC SETTING: A NARRATIVE REVIEW OF THE LITERATUREMatteo Amicucci, Research Nurse in Department of Onco Hematology and Cell and Gene Therapy, Bambino Gesù Children’s Hospital, matteo.amicucci@opbg.net, Rome Valentina Biagioli, Research Fellow in Nursing and Allied Health Professional Development, Continuing Education and Research, Bambino Gesù Children’s Hospital, valentina.biagioli@opbg.net, Rome Emanuela Tiozzo, Nurse Coordinator in in Nursing and Allied Health Professional Development, Continuing Education and Research, Bambino Gesù Children’s Hospital, emanuela.tiozzo@opbg.net, Rome Orsola Gawronski, Nurse in Nursing and Allied Health Professional Development, Continuing Education and Research, Bambino Gesù Children’s Hospital, orsola.gawronski@opbg.net, Rome Italo Ciaralli, Nurse Coordinator in Department of Onco Hematology and Cell and Gene Therapy, Bambino Gesù Children’s Hospital, italo.ciaralli@opbg.net, Rome Immacolata Dall’Oglio, Nurse in Nursing and Allied Health Professional Development, Continuing Education and Research, Bambino Gesù Children’s Hospital, immacolata.dalloglio@opbg.net, RomeIntroduction: Research implementation is slower in nursing and allied health professionals (AHPs). Several studies describe many barriers for research implementation in these professionals. This issue involves also pediatric nurses, who often face even greater barriers. Objective: to review the literature describing interventions promoting nursing and AHPs research implementation in the pediatric setting and their outcomes. Methods: In 2018, articles describing interventions promoting nursing and HAP research with no time limit were searched in PubMed, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, Scopus and Web of Science. Results: Of 323 records, only 5 met the inclusion criteria. Included articles examined single or bundle interventions implemented in research or clinical studies, nurses (n. 4) and AHPs (n. 1) in the pediatric setting. Collaboration with academics, statistical and library services, creation of a hospital committee, collaboration with other centers, education and curriculum, involvement in journal clubs or competitive participation in Journal Clubs as “The Great American Cookie Experiment”, ground rounds, poster presentations, participation in research events were the most cited actions to improve knowledge and involve nurses and AHPs in research. Conclusion: Literature highlights widely implemented actions undertaken to increase interest towards research. These could be implemented considering research as a foundation for high-quality care also in pediatric nursing.
21 martina.distefano@opbg.netno preference, either oneGlobal Challenges for caring for Children, Young People and Familiesthe new role of the nurse: from the clinic to patient educationMartina Di Stefano, nurse,pediatric hospital Bambino Gesù', martina.distefano@opbg.net, Italy Martina Girone ,nurse, pediatric hospital Bambino Gesù', martina.girone@opbg.net, Italy Salvatore Cortese, nurse, pediatric hospital Bambino Gesù', salvatore.cortese@opbg.net, Italy Daniela Cianchi , nursing coordinator, pediatric hospital Bambino Gesù, daniela.chianchi@opbg.net, Italy Marina D'Agostino, nursing coordinator ,pediatric hospital Bambino Gesù, marina.dagostino@opbg.net, Italy Daniele Cristiani, nurse, freelance nurse , pediatric hospital bambino Gesù, danielecristiani1994@gmail.comIntroduction: The figure of the nurse today also covers the training of parents in the preparation of home therapy. The difficulty arises when the family does not understand international languages, so staff need an auxiliary tool. Objective: The objective is to develop an audiovisual application, always available to clarify any doubts of the parent regarding the dilution, preparation and administration of home therapy. Methods: The idea was born in the Bambino Gesu 'pediatric hospital, where users are multicultural. The project was created for a patient of Kazakh origin who underwent liver transplantation with an illiterate parent. Results: The results are immediate: reduction of errors concerning the dosages of drugs that in the past have caused damage to the patient with the need for urgent hospitalization and a highly effective communication method. Discussion: Videos were processed with the addition of audio files recorded with the help of a Kazakh-speaking interpreter. At the appointed time, preceded by an audible alarm, an illustrative video of the pre-preparation of the drug to be administered began. Conclusions: Today, with increasingly active migratory flows, it is the job of the health worker to carry out transcultural nursing of the Madeline Leininger terica. Thanks to new technologies and the training of the nursing staff, young patients are also the center of nursing care at the time of discharge, as the use of this application shows.
22 alessiac94@hotmail.ita poster presentationChronic diseases and Complex NeedsIncontinence Associated Dermatitis (IAD) in paediatric population with gastrointestinal disorders: series of case treated with polymeric-cryanoacrylate solutionAlessia Campoli, nurse, Bambino Gesù Children's Hospital, alessia.campoli@opbg.net, Italy. Maria Rosa De Maio, nurse, Bambino Gesù Children's Hospital, mariarosa.demaio@opbg.net, Italy. Monica Rossi, nurse, Bambino Gesù Children's Hospital, monica2.rossi@opbg.net, Italy. Manuel Pomponi, head nurse, Bambino Gesù Children's Hospital, manuel.pomponi@opbg.net, Italy, Renato Tambucci, medical doctor, Bambino Gesù Children's Hospital, renato.tambucci@opbg.net, Italy. Guido Ciprandi, medical doctor, Bambino Gesù Children's Hospital, guido.ciprandi@opbg.net, Italy.Introduction:Incontinence associated dermatitis (IAD) is a specific type of irritant contact dermatitis. The aetiology of IAD is related to both chemical and physical irritation of the skin. Few evidences are described in a paediatric population with IAD. Objectives:Purpose of this study is to recognize this entity in children with a special focus on patients affected by gastrointestinal disorders and faecal incontinence more likely cause of skin breakdown in the genital-perianal area. Methods: A series of three children admitted to Bambino Gesù Children’s Hospital is reported. All these patient’s disease were responsible for a severe fecal incontinence causing: significant skin breakdown and high levels of pain. After skin cleansing, IAD were treated with a polymeric-cryanoacrylate solution, applicated every 48/72 hours. The film barrier prevent a direct contact of caustic irritants. Results:The treatment has been continued until continence restoration. After two days from the first application the skin was less erythematous, skin breakdown was reduced in size and the pain was lowered in all patients. Discussion:The application of this film barrier showed its efficacy in reducing skin damages, the pain is rapidly reduced and inflammation/infections signs controlled. Conclusion:The outcome achieved using this novel approach was considered satisfactory in treating IAD in a paediatric population with a stressfull faecal incontinence due to severe gastrointestinal diseases.
23 bmpoutopoulou@gmail.coma poster presentationNursing education and leadershipFactors which affect quality of life of Emergency Department nurses: A reviewIoannis Kasimis, Nurse MSc, PhD(c),jkrn84@gmail.com, Greece Varvara Boutopoulou, Nurse MSc, PhD, RN, Academic Scholar University of Athens, bmpoutopoulou@gmail.com, Greece Pantelis Perdikaris, Assistant Professor University of Peloponese, pantelisperdikaris@gmail.com, Greece Tsoumakas Konstantinos, Professor of Paediatrics, Faculty of Nursing, Univaristy of Athens, ktsoumak@nurs.uoa.gr, Greece Prinari Aggeliki, Coordinator Surgical Secton University Hospital Herakleion Crete, nurse-dep@pagni.gr, Crete Vasiliki Matziou, Professor of Pediatric Nursing University of Athens, vmatziou@nurs.uoa.gr, GreeceIntroduction: Quality of care provided is largely depend on quality of life of working nurses. In Emergency Department (ED) where the working conditions are stressful, nurses’ quality of life is impaired. Aim: Aim of this review was the investigation of the factors which affect the quality of life of ED nurses. Methods: Pubmed/Medline, Cochrane Library and Scopus were used. Key word combinations of ‘Emergency Department’, ‘sleep’, ‘fatigue’, ‘quality of life’ and ‘nurses’ were applied. Results: Nurses’ quality of life is defined as the situation where nurses can meet many personal needs through their clinical experience thus achieving better organization and effective goals in their work. Nurses who work in ED show severe physical fatigue and psychological exhaustion. The major parameters which affect ED nurses’ quality of life is lack of sleep in combination with the demanding heavy workload. Controversy studies have shown that ED nurses have higher quality of life in comparison with other nurses due to patients’ support and direct psychological reward. Conclusions: More studies should be conducted in order to understand how ED nurses’ quality of life is affected and which meters should be accordingly taken to improve ED working conditions and raise quality of life of ED nurses.
24 kairi.sokk@kliinikum.eea poster presentationNutritionHome enteral nutrition service implementation in Tartu University Children’s HospitalKari Sokk, RN 1, Külli Mitt, MD 1,2, Oivi Uibo, MD, PhD 1,3 1 Children's Clinic of Tartu University Hospital, 2 Medical manager, NutriMedical OÜ, 3 Tartu University, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Department of PediatricsIntroduction: From 01.01.19 Estonian Sickness Foundation started new service, home enteral feeding service (HEN) for hospitals and outpatient departments, in case the hospital has certified enteral feeding team. Tartu University (TU) Children`s Hospital enteral feeding team started from 01.06.19 covering patients from South-Estonia mostly. OBJECTIVES: To give an overview of HEN implementation in TU Children’s hopsital from 01.06.19 – 31.01.20. METHODS: Overview of 23 patients (13 boys/10 girls) from 9 months till 19 years with diagnosis of malnutrition/dysphagia and nasogastric, gastrostomy or jejunostomy feeding, who started on HEN during 01.06.19- 31.01.20: weight/height gain, feeding methods, enteral nutrition choices, cooperation between enteral feeding team and caregivers. RESULTS: HEN protocol was created to follow patients systematically: nutrition evaluation (measurement of weight/height in dynamics); calculations of energy/nutrients need; the enteral food was chose according to age, clinical status and special needs; feeding method was changed suitable to pediatric patients; enteral feeding-connected gastrointestinal symptoms were followed and treated; enteral feeding team teached and improved the enteral feeding knowledge of patient`s caregivers. DISCUSSION: New HEN is very important treatment to improve nutrional status covering patient`s energy and nutrients needs for optimal growth and development and to support and teach caregivers. The effectiveness of HEN depends on certified enteral feeding team in the hospital. CONCLUSIONS: The HEN was implemented in TU Children`s Hospital. Following the HEN protocol by the certified enteral feeding team improves nutrition status of malnourished patients.
25 inta.kalnina@bkus.lvan oral presentationPalliative and end of life careMEASURE PROCESS OF CARE IN PEDIATRIC PALLIATIVE CAREInta Kalnina, lecturer, Riga Stradins University, inta.kalnina@rsu.lv, LatviaInroduction. Pediatric palliative care is defined as the prevention and relief of suffering of pediatric patients and their families facing the prblems associated with life-threating illness. This problems include the physical, psychological, social and spiritual suffering of patients, and psychological, social and spiritual suffering of family members. Duaring the process of care nurses should consider the needs of the patient and their family. Objectives. Previous studies show that important factors affecting palliative care patient family needs are related with support of professionals in area of information and finances. Aim of this study is to measure process of care from patient perspective. Methods. In cross sectional study was applied the quantitative research method, where as an instrument Measure of process of care was used. The survey consists of 20 statement that are divided in 5 categories of family centred care principles: encouragement and cooperation, provision of child-specific information, coordinated and comprehensive care, a respectful and supportive environment. Results. Families were more positive about such principles as respectful and supportive environment (M = 4,84, SE = 1,27) and coordinated and comprehensive care (M = 4,65, SE = 1,8). The worse rating was in provision of child-specific information category (M = 3,43, SE = 1,24). Discussion. Families were more positive about such principles as respectful and supportive environment and coordinated care. The worse rating was in provision of child-specific information category that correlated with family needs for information. Conclusions. A fundamental aspect of palliative care is the continuity of care which involves availability and follow-up by healthcare specialists, access to information and other medical treatment and care related resources. Currently, the services provided by palliative care professionals are partly oriented towards providing patient centred care.
26 claudia.desantis91@gmail.comno preference, either oneChildhood InjuryPREVENTING MEDICAL DEVICE RELATED PRESSURE ULCERS IN PICU: THE “GRIEF”De Santis Claudia, Pediatric Nurse, Bambino Gesù Pediatric Hospital, claudia.desantis@opbg.net, Rome, Italy. Giuseppe Chessa, Nurse, Bambino Gesù Pediatric Hospital, giuseppe.chessa@opbg.net, Rome, Italy. Diana Giannarelli, Statistical Researcher, IFO Hospital, diana.giannarelli@ifo.gov.it, Rome, ItalyIntroduction:Pressure ulcers in unusual locations are generally caused by medical devices,defined by NPUAP in 2016.The risk of developing a pressure injury is increased in ICU and patients with devices have a 2.4 times higher risk. Objectives:to demonstrate that the use of the GRIEF can reduce incidence and prevalence of medical device related pressure ulcers(MDRPU) in PICU. Methods:the GRIEF was developed,to be used by nurses during the daily care.Each letter worked as part of a check list:G= size of device R= rotating locations of mobile devices I= inspecting the skin E= skin elasticity F= fixing the device.It’s an observational study,included 62 patients for the pre stage and 52 patients for the post stage,age 0 to 10 years,hospitalized in ICU in a time frame between 48 hours and 30 days. Results:During pre-phase,the incidence of MDRPU was 58.1%;during the post-phase was 30.8%.The used of the tool’s items was analyzed. Discussion:there was 27.3% reduction of the incidence of MDRPU in the post-phase and also a reduction of the maximum injury stage registred.There has also been an high usage of the tool. Conclusions:in our experience the use of the GRIEF is able to reduce the incidence of MDRPU in PICU.
27 olofk@hi.isno preference, either onePaediatric Critical and Intensive careClinical Profile and Outcomes of Children with Congenital Heart Defect Admitted to Adult Intensive Care Units in IcelandOlof Kristjansdottir, post-doctoral fellow, University of Iceland, olofk@hi.is, Iceland. Gudrun Kristjansdottir, professor, University of Iceland, gkrist@hi.is, Iceland. Gunnhildur Vidarsdottir, BS student, University of Iceland, guv19@hi.is, Iceland.The number and survivorship of children born with congenital heart defects (CHD) is rising. Inevitably the allocation of health care resources including complex intensive care unit (ICU) care, will grow. There is a need for baseline data for quality care parameters and monitoring progresses in assisting future ICU care services and space for this vulnerable group. The aim of this study was to comprehensively describes and explore the clinical profile and outcomes of children with CHD who are admitted to adult ICU (AICU) in Iceland. A nationwide retrospective chart review for all children diagnosed with CHD and are admitted to AICU in Iceland, between 2011-2018, was conducted. Twenty-four (63%) of the 38 reviewed patient charts were < 3 years old, and 22 (58%) were female. Twenty-one (55%) were diagnosed with atrial septal defect (ASD), and 19 (50%) admissions were acute. The mean length of stay was 4.5 days and the mean disease severity at admission (PRISM score) was 10.4. PRISM score was highest for patients that died (M=22.5) and those admitted for ≥ 48 hours (M=16). Four (10.5%) patients died. This study provides a unique nationwide overview of AICU admissions of children diagnosed with CHD. Compared with Icelandic studies analyzing all children admitted to AICU, our results suggest that children with CHD have longer AICU stay, are more severely ill at admission, and have higher mortality rates. This is partially supported by studies using pediatric and neonatal ICU data.
28 immacolata.dalloglio@opbg.netan oral presentationGlobal Challenges for caring for Children, Young People and FamiliesSelf-care in paediatric patients living with chronic disease: a systematic literature review of conceptual modelsClaudia Carlin, PedRN, Health Professions Development, Continuing Education and Research Service, Bambino Gesù Children’s Hospital, IRCCS, Piazza Sant'Onofrio 4, 00165 Rome, Italy claudia.carlin@opbg.net Giulia Gasperini, RN, MSN, PhDstudent Department of Biomedicine and Prevention University of Rome Tor Vergata giulia.g1994@icloud.com Valentina Biagioli, RN, MSN, PhD Health Professions Development, Continuing Education and Research Service Bambino Gesù Children’s Hospital, IRCCS Piazza Sant'Onofrio 4, 00165 Rome, Italy valentina.biagioli@opbg.net Emanuela Tiozzo, PedRN, MSN, Health Professions Development, Continuing Education and Research Service, Bambino Gesù Children’s Hospital, IRCCS, Piazza Sant'Onofrio 4, 00165 Rome, Italy emanuela.tiozzo@opbg.net Immacolata Dall’Oglio PedRN, MSN, PhD Health Professions Development, Continuing Education and Research Service, Bambino Gesù Children’s Hospital, IRCCS, Piazza Sant'Onofrio 4, 00165 Rome, Italy immacolata.dalloglio@opbg.net in collaboration with: Self-care in Pediatrics Study Group, Italy https://it.research.net/r/SELF_CARE_IN_PEDIATRICS_STUDY_GROUP,Introduction: To improve outcomes in Children and Young Adults (CYA) living with Chronic Disease (CD,it is important to promote self-care through education and support. A comprehensive review of frameworks about self-care in CYA affected by CD is lacking. This study aims to review papers describing theories or conceptual models of self-care in the context of CYA affected by CD. Methods: A systematic review of the literature was undertaken. PubMED, Scopus, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, EMBASE, Web of Science, Joanna Briggs Institute, PsycINFO and PsycARTICLES were searched in July 2019. The review included all types of peer-reviewed papers with no limits of time and language. Results: Out of 2,674 records, 17 papers met the inclusion criteria. Of these, 6 had the main aim to describe a theory or a model of self-care, self-management or similar concepts. Another 6 papers aimed to develop or to revise pre-existent models or theories. Five papers had other aims, not primarily connected with the illustration of a model or a theory. Included papers had study samples of children with different types of CD: Type 1 Diabetes, Chronic pain, Conversion disorder, Dwarfism or other. Discussion and Conclusions: This review sheds light on theories and models that describe self-care in CYA patients living with chronic disease. We developed an overall model considering a shift of agency from the family to the patient as the main actor of the self-management process of the chronic disease.
29 martina.girone@opbg.netno preference, either oneChildren's surgeryLiver transplantation: management without infectionsMartina Girone,nurse , Children's hospital Bambino Gesù, martina.girone@opbg.net, Italy Salvatore Cortese, Children's hospital Bambino Gesù, salvatore.cortese@opbg.net, Italy Daniela Cianchi, nurse coordinator , Children's hospital Bambino Gesù, Daniela.cianchi@opbg.net, Italy Marina D'Agostino, nurse coordinator , Children's hospital Bambino Gesù, marina.dagostino@opbg.net, Italy Cristina Serra, nurse coordinator, Children's hospital Bambino Gesù, cristina.serra@opbg.net, Italy Martina Di Stefano, nurse, Children's hospital Bambino Gesù, martina.distefano@opbg.net, ItalyIntroduction: An issue as delicate as it is complex is organ transplantation in the pediatric patient, in this case the postoperative management of liver transplantation will be discussed. Objectives: the main objective of the study is to reduce infections related to nursing care in the post-transplant course. Methods: the post-operative pathways of patients undergoing transplantation of the hepatology unit of the Bambino Gesù hospital were compared; in particular, observational studies were carried out on the management of the necessary aids on post-operative assistance: cvc, abdominal drains, etc ... Results: the results were exciting, that is, with a correct management of the aids, the infection rate was drastically reduced in immunosuppressed patients for therapeutic needs. Discussion: once undergoing liver transplantation, there is a need to reduce the patient's immune response and avoid rejection of the new organ. This condition makes it even more unfavorable to avert care-related infections, but with proper management of the devices listed above and therapeutic education for the families of young patients, the risk of infection is significantly reduced. Conclusion: the training of staff and therefore the figure of the caregiver, favor the rapid recovery of such sensitive and complex patients. In addition, non-healthcare personnel should continue to be sensitized to vaccination to continue protecting immunosuppressed patients
30 anni.pakarinen@utu.fino preference, either oneChild health promotionGamification for Health promotionAnni Pakarinen, Senior researcher, Development manager, University of Turku, Department of Nursing Science, anni.pakarinen@utu.fi, Finland & Research group “Gamification for Health promotion”, University of Turku, FinlandIntroduction Gamification has shown to engage and motivate users, increase knowledge and skills, and facilitate health behavior changes. During 2013, a group of researchers from University of Turku, began to explore the possibilities of gamification in health promotion. Since then, several gamified interventions have been developed. Objectives We aim to develop and evaluate gamified interventions for children, adolescents, families and professionals. Methods The development process is iterative and follows rigorously user centered design principles. Usability, feasibility and effectiveness of the interventions are evaluated from the perspective of the users, contexts and outcomes. Results Currently, five different gamified projects are ongoing. EmpowerKids is mobile assisted intervention aiming to empower children to make healthy choices. Fume is mobile game intervention aiming to support pre-adolescents’ tobacco-free life. Movenator is mobile game intervention aiming to promote pre-adolescents’ physical activity. Dreamcatcher is mobile game intervention aiming to reduce anxiety of preschoolers before anesthesia. StepApp is mobile assisted intervention aiming to support the wellbeing and relationships of stepfamilies. Discussion Since gamification is a growing area in health care, many new gamified projects are established. Lessons learned and findings from our studies may help other research groups in planning and implementing gamified interventions.
31 bfrechet15@su.eduan oral presentationMental Health Children and Young People Nursing"Niceology: An Online Course"Barbara Frechette, DNP, PMHNP‑BC Director of Online Graduate Nursing Program School of Nursing MCPHS University United StatesIntroduction: Globally, the prevalence of mental health disorders can be as high as 25%. Students with behavioral problems may be apathetic or angry resulting in their avoidance of schoolwork because of a history of trauma. Approximately one-half of children in school have experienced some kind of trauma. Children are subjected to a variety of stressors, many of which reflect types of hurtful interaction. A call for action is needed. The purpose of this educational intervention is to offer teachers a training workshop to offset the climate of toxic stress. Objective: The deleterious mental health outcomes that stem from bullying contribute to both suicide and psychopathology. The need to promote psychological self-care justifies undertaking such learning. Consistent with Abraham Maslow's (1986) characterization of self-actualizing people, kindness and fairness are presented as essential to the reliable, healthy acquisition of ableness and closeness—the basic psychological needs of everyone. Moreover, kindness and fairness are put forth as undeniable ways of lessening and healing losses that can weaken and distort self-worth. The theorists, Alfred Adler, Carl Rogers, and Lawrence Kohlberg, are especially salient in understanding psychological concepts. Lastly, cognitive theorists and researchers have provided the groundwork for the perspective-shaping strategies advocated. Participants are encouraged to explore the critical thinking skills integral to a cognitive-behavioral approach. Methods: The proposal will include a purposive sample of teachers. The proposal will explore teachers’ perspectives on mental health education. The knowledge gleaned can possibly contribute to the wellbeing of students by providing information into how school teachers perceive mental health education. Results: The results may increase teachers’ confidence in understanding basic mental health education. It may contribute to a better appreciation for the need for ongoing self-care. Conclusion: There is a call to action to improve upon mental health education. Although school professionals appreciate the need to develop and implement mental health lessons, many understandably feel inadequately prepared to do so. There is a need for training that identifies reasonable expectations, relatable knowledge, practical skills, and accessible resources. The learning strategies offered in the online course are applicable to everyone. Because educators providing the self-care strategies reviewed are repeatedly exposed to these strategies, they usually also benefit. They may, for example, become less susceptible to burn out.
32 mianlai@utu.fia poster presentationAdolescents' healthcareSexual and gender diversity in adolescence: The development of a conceptual model to support secondary school nursingMinna Laiti, MHSc, Department of Nursing science, University of Turku, mianlai@utu.fi, Finland Heidi Parisod, PhD, Department of Nursing science, University of Turku, and The Nursing Research Foundation (NRF), Helsinki, heidi.parisod@utu.fi, Finland Anni Pakarinen, PhD, Department of Nursing science, University of Turku, ankorh@utu.fi, Finland Salla Sariola, PhD, Academy Research Fellow & University Lecturer, Faculty of Political sciences, Discipline of Sociology, University of Helsinki, salla.sariola@helsinki.fi,Finland Sanna Salanterä, PhD, Professor of Clinical Nursing Science, Department of Nursing science, University of Turku, and Turku University Hospital, sansala@utu.fi, FinlandSexual and gender minority (LGBTQ+) youth are still an invisible group in healthcare. Secondary school nursing is a healthcare service that can support the development of adolescents’ sexuality and gender. However, research around school nursing is scarce, and more research is needed about how discussion of sexual and gender diversity can be conducted between LGBTQ+ youth and school nurse. The purpose of the doctoral thesis is to develop a conceptual model about discussion of sexual and gender diversity between LGBTQ+ youth and secondary school nurse. The thesis consists of four sub-studies with qualitative methods; integrative review, qualitative survey, focus group interview, and action research. Current results show there is limited research about LGBTQ+ youth in healthcare, LGBTQ+ youth saw secondary school nurse as a supportive adult and an information source, but their needs were not always recognized. Sexual and gender diversity is still somewhat unrecognized in healthcare, including secondary school nursing. LGBTQ+ youth are seeking support and information from secondary school nurses, but engagement with school nurses is not always happening ideally. School nurses need more knowledge and skills to discuss sexual and gender diversity with LGBTQ+ youth to support their development. School nursing as a significant health service for adolescents needs to be developed into more inclusive about the development of sexuality and gender identity to offer high-quality care.
33 airin.treiman-kiveste@ut.eea poster presentationPain in childrenNurses´perceptions of neonates’ procedural pain alleviation with non-pharmacological methods and parental guidance in Estonian hospitalsAirin Treiman-Kiveste RN, MSc. Assistant in Institution of Family Medicine and Public Health Faculty of Medicine University of Tartu. Tarja Pölkki, Docent,PhD Specialist in Clinical Nursing Science Unit of Children and Women Oulu University Hospital Adjunct Professor Univerity of Oulu Finland Ruth Kalda, PhD. Professor of Family Medicine Institute of Family Medicine and Public Health Faculty of Medicine University of Tartu. Estonia Mari Kangasniemi, Docent, PhD Visiting Professor Institute of Family Medicine and Public Health Faculty of Medicine University of Tartu. Estonia. University of Turku Faculty of Medicine Deparment of Nursin Science University Researcher. FinlandIntroduction: Painful procedures on neonates are often identified as the most distressing components of medical care for them and their parents. Procedural pain in neonates can be controlled by non-pharmacological methods what refers to short impact methods as change of treatment environments or psychological, cognitive and behaviral strategies to relieve. The weakness in neonates pain care is that nurses have limited initiatives to teach and encourage parents to be involved in the pain care. The purpose of this study was to describe what kind of non-pharmacological methods do nurses use and how they involve parents when alleviating neonates´ procedural pain. Method: A descriptive cross-sectional survey study was conducted in 2019 among of all nurses (N = 149) who are working in the neonatal and infant medicine or NICUs in the four Estonian hospitals. The response rate was 75% and data was analysed by statistical methods. Results: The most useful non-pharmacological pain alleviation methods were behavioural changes as touching and positioning infants, and the rarely used methods were the use of music, encouraging mothers for breastfeeding and parents for kangaroo care. The nurses ’age and work experience was greatly related to the counselling of parents. Nurses reported that they ask parents to go elsewhere during the painful procedure Discussion: Nurse´s guide parents to use the same non-pharmacological pain evaluating methods that they self-use on daily care. That may increase parental involvement but may be based on nurse’s needs not infant and parent’s needs. Conclusion:The focus has to be set on nurses' attitudes and habits in engaging parents in non-pharmacological pain alleviation. Therefore educational interventions for nurses are needed in order to improve pain management practice.
34 siretlaanelaid@nooruse.eea poster presentationChild health promotionTartu basic school’s second-grade teacher’s opinion on beneficial and non-beneficial factors of pupils hand hygienePiret Simm-Pärle, lecturer, Tartu Health Care College, piretsimmparle@nooruse.ee, Estonia Susanna Koger, student, Tartu Health Care College, susanna.koger94@gmail.com, Estonia Triinu Tarto, student, Tartu Health Care College, triinu.tarto@gmail.com, Estonia Siret Läänelaid, lecturer, Tartu health Care College, siretlaanelaid@nooruse.ee, EstoniaContagious diseases in childhood are a serious problem in Estonia and in the rest of the world. For school children, infectious diseases also cause an absence from school. It is known that the most effective way to avoid contagious diseases is proper hand hygiene. There have been a lot of studies, that talk about the importance of handwashing interventions and their effect on preventing diseases but few of them have researched the influencing factors of handwashing. To the authors’ knowledge, there have been no empirical studies in Estonia, that have researched influencing factors of pupils’ hand hygiene. The purpose of this thesis was to describe Tartu basic school’s second-grade teacher’s opinion on beneficial and non-beneficial factors of elementary school students hand hygiene. During this study, 12 class teachers were interviewed using semi-structured questionnaires. Interviews were recorded and transcribed, the collected data was analysed using the inductive content analysis method. The results showed that the beneficial factors for proper hand hygiene were the following: the availability of resources and facilities; time; positive influence; pupil’s own positive habits, the guidance of teachers and handwashing interventions. Non-beneficial factors were lack of facilities, resources (warm water, soap, paper towels), time and positive influences; the height of facilities and pupils’ own priorities.
35 anna.bergadano@unito.itan oral presentationGlobal Challenges for caring for Children, Young People and FamiliesDigital nursing for care and first discharge in pediatric oncohematology: development of an APP1. Deborah Rosso Pognant, PRN, Department of Public and Pediatric Health Sciences, University of Turin, deborah.rosso@hotmail.it, Italy 2. Bergadano Anna, PRN, RMN, Paediatric Onco-Haematology, Stem Cell Transplantation and Cellular Therapy Division, Regina Margherita Children's Hospital Torino, Department of Public Health and Paediatric Sciences, University of Torino, anna.bergadano@unito.it, Italy 3. Laura Odetto, PRN, RMN, Città della Salute e della Scienza di Torino, lodetto@cittadellasalute.to.it, Italy 4. Franca Fagioli, MD, Paediatric Onco-Haematology, Stem Cell Transplantation and Cellular Therapy Division, Regina Margherita Children's Hospital, Torino; Department of Public Health and Paediatric Sciences, University of Torino, franca.fagioli@unito.it, Italy 5. Marilena Bambaci, PRN RMN, Division Pediatric2 Regina Margherita Children's Hospital Torino, marilena.bambaci@unito.it, ItalyIntroduction Children with neoplastic disease and their caregivers must face a difficult clinical pathway which causes anxiety and difficulties. In order to help families to deal with this situation, the Oncohematology department of Regina Margherita Children’s Hospital in Turin(Italy) already offers booklets, in line with the evidences. Objective Development of an APP to welcome and inform caregivers and patients related to the above mentioned department. Methods After an analysis of literature, a multidisciplinary work group was created to define the study’s target population, contents, sources, application methods and followed the development of the APP step by step. Results The application has been developed containing the predefined contents. The group realized the following sections:information and reception, drug therapy, calendar and symptomatology monitoring, notes. It is possible to change languages and find links to the contacts of the Hospital and to reliable sites of consultation. Discussion The app can bring many benefits: quickly and safe informations; optimization in adherence to therapy and quality of life; improvement of the symptoms; stimulation of reflection; greater responsibility and involvement of one's disease; encouragement of children self-care and achievement of goals. Conclusion By the APP use, nurses will be able to provide better assistance to families, with a positive impact on the social recognition of nursing profession.
36 ro_h@live.itan oral presentationChronic diseases and Complex NeedsDEVELOPMENT OF VIDEO TUTORIALS FOR THE TRAINING OF ADOLESCENTS IN THE AUTOMATION OF CVC TYPE BROVIAC IN THE SERVICE OF HOME PALLIATIVE CAREAndrea Rosella Alucard Samaniego Gomez, nurse, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore - Presidio Ospedale Cottolengo di Torino Marisa Bonino, pediatric nurse, UniTo.Introduction: Adolescent behaviors are determined by the desire for independence, leading the kids to decide to manage themselves even in a pathological situation. Multimedia methods can be used to support education in this context through the creation of a video tutorial that describes the Broviac type CVC self-medication technique which can be inserted in the reference care context and conducted with the supervision of the nurse. Target: Create a video tutorial that describes the self-medication of Broviac CVCs to be used for the training of adolescents belonging to the Pediatric Home Palliative Care Service. Materials and methods: The project followed 2 phases: a bibliographic research on the effects of the video tutorial with respect to learning and on the benefits of self-medication on the PA; the realization of the video tutorial on self-medication technique which was subsequently evaluated by expert professionals in the field. Results: The video tutorial was supervised by a panel of expert nurses from the pediatric oncohematology clinic. It had a positive response about the clarity and execution of the procedure, the quality of images and audio elements. Discussion: The video was created according to the characteristics that emerged from the literature, it can be included in the care path by providing for sharing with the PA and the multi-professional team. Conclusions: The inclusion of the video tutorial in the education and training programs can represent an important tool for adolescents suffering from tumor disease to achieve autonomy which is synonymous with freedom and normality, two fundamental aspects that can support a healing or achievement process of the best possible health. Keyword: caregivers, teaching materials, health education, catheterization, central venous, self care.
37 dragica.bestak@kbc-zagreb.hran oral presentationMental Health Children and Young People NursingEFFECTS OF LIGHT ON HEALTHDragica Beštak, master of Nursing, University center Zagreb,pediatric clinic, CroatiaSUMMARY Introduction: In accordance with the changes of day and night, the vast majority of the living world has adjusted their biorhythm, dietary habits, physiological needs, hormone production and many other processes and behaviours that we do not even think about. An additional threat to the disruption if day and night cycle is the development of technology, which tries to make public lighting more like daylight. Goal: In this review, we will be introduced to artificial lighting and the associated health problems it can cause in people connected to shift work at night, with particular reference to the UV and blue components of the spectrum, and their impact on disease onset through prolonged exposure to light that reduces production of protective hormones. Discussion: Biological rhythms are the time cycles within which many of the normal functions of the human body occur, including periods of sleep and activity, and most of the physiological and endocrine processes in the brain. By discovering and understanding the impact of artificial light on an individual's biological rhythms, it is possible to investigate the association between night shift work and various mood disorders, or any other mental or physical health problems that may develop over time. Conclusion: Long-term disruption of circadian rhythm leads to adverse health effects such as increased cardiovascular risk, diabetes, overweight, insomnia, chronic insomnia-related fatigue and depression, and other diseases (malignancies). All of the above points to the complexity of the workplace lighting issue as well as to the problems that may arise while resolving it.
38 alessandra.pol@opbg.netan oral presentationChild health promotionUse of community services in paediatric patients accessing accident and emergency (A&E) departments for non-urgent cases - preliminary resultsAlessandra Pol RN, Paediatric Emergency Department, Bambino Gesù Children’s Hospital, IRCCS, Alessandra.pol@opbg.net, Italy. Valentina Biagioli RN, PhD Health Professions Development, Continuing Education and Research Service, Bambino Gesù Children’s Hospital, IRCCS, valentina.biagioli@opbg.net, Italy. Claudia Carlin PedRN, Health Professions Development, Continuing Education and Research Service, Bambino Gesù Children’s Hospital, IRCCS, claudia.carlin@opbg.net. Simone Piga, Unit of Epidemiology, Bambino Gesù Children’s Hospital, IRCCS, Simone.piga@opbg.net, Italy Immacolata Dall’Oglio PedRN, MSN, Health Professions Development, Continuing Education and Research Service, Bambino Gesù Children’s Hospital, IRCCS, immacolata.dalloglio@opbg.net, Italy In collaboration with: White Code Study Group , Bambino Gesù Children’s Hospital, IRCCS, https://it.research.net/r/WHITE_CODE_STUDY_GROUP, immacolata.dalloglio@opbg.net, ItalyIntroduction. Patients accessing accident and emergency (A&E) departments for non-urgent cases can cause overcrowding, which concurs to reducing quality of care, increase adverse events for delayed care and compromise clinical outcomes. Improving use of community services can reduce A&E non-urgent accesses. Objectives. Examine the use of community services in parents of paediatric patients accessing A&E for non-urgent cases. Methods. A cross-sectional study. A 40-item paper and pencil questionnaire was administered to parents of children aged between 3 months and 6 years who accessed the A&E for non-urgent cases from July 2018 to June 2019. Results. Parents of 239 patients (age=2.6±1.58; male=58%) were enrolled. The most common reason for non-urgent A&E access was fever (n=104, 43.5%). Many participants consulted ‘sometimes/always’ the family paediatrician (n=198, 83.2%) but to ‘seldom/never’ (≥84%) use other health services in the community. Most parents (n=192, 82.1%) did not even know where community services were located. Discussion. Parents accessing the A&E for non-urgent cases rarely used or were aware of community health services, with the exception of the family paediatrician’s office. Conclusions. Parents need more education on how to access community health services. So, they could be empowered to manage the most common paediatric symptoms, such as fever and skin rash, and avoid accessing A&E for non-urgent reasons.
39 belletti.paola@tiscali.itan oral presentationGlobal Challenges for caring for Children, Young People and FamiliesPediatric Care complexity: an experimental tool1. Belletti Paola PRN, Pediatric General Surgery, Regina Margherita Children’s Hospital Torino, belletti.paola@tiscali.it 2. Bergese Ilaria, RN,RMN, Emergency Department, Regina Margherita Children’s Hospital Torino, ibergese@cittadellasalute.to.it, Italy 3. Stea Francesca, PRN, RMN Emergency Department, Regina Margherita Children’s Hospital Torino, fstea@cittadellasalute.to.it 4. Di Maio Pasquale, RN, RMN, Pediatric General Surgery, Regina Margherita Children’s Hospital Torino, pdimaio@cittadellasalute.to.it 5. Paleologo Mario, RN, RMN, Città della Salute e della Scienza di Torino, mpaleologo@cittadellasalute.to.it, ItalyIntroduction Children with clinical conditions of high complexity of care considerably a reduced percentage of the total admissions, however the assistance implies a significant consumption of human resources with relative significant economic impact. In the current socio-economic context, to ensure effective, efficient assistance that also respects the principle of economy, the use of tools that make the calculation of staff needs measurable and objective is imperative in order to ensure adequate staffing. Methods: an instrument has been developed represented by a card containing 22 items. Each item corresponds to 5 variables necessary to graduate the possible manifestations of care complexity. Each variable is assigned a score according to the ICF-CY classification. The research took place in pediatric short intensive observation unit (Regina Margherita Pediatric Hospital), Turin,Italy. Results: The instrument has been tested for a period of 3 months. During this phase it was possible to establish a cut-off-score able to select patients with complex conditions from the point of view of care and who therefore needed to be taken in charge by nursing staff with greater clinical-care skills. Discussion: This instrument represents a first approach to establish pediatric clinical complexity. In a situation in which the turnover is high, it is possibile that the level of competence is not homogeneous and this tool could be an useful strategy to ensure safe care. ConclusionThe instrument has been shown to be easy and with a high sensitivity in recognizing the complex patient.
40 eli.garau@gmail.comno preference, either oneGlobal Challenges for caring for Children, Young People and FamiliesNurses and pediatric oncological patients expectations regarding the activation of a home nursing care service: qualitative analysis1. Elisa Garau, PRN, studRMN, Paediatric Onco-Haematology, Stem Cell Transplantation and Cellular Therapy Division,Regina Margherita Children's Hospital Torino, Department of Public Health and PaediatricSciences, University of Torino, eli.garau@gmail.com, Italy 2. Laura Odetto, PRN,RMN, Città della Salute e della Scienza di Torino, lodetto@cittadellasalute.to.it, Italy 3.Franca Fagioli, MD, Paediatric Onco-Haematology, Stem Cell Transplantation and CellularTherapy Division, Regina Margherita Children's Hospital, Torino; Department of PublicHealth and Paediatric Sciences, University of Torino, franca.fagioli@unito.it, ItalyINTRODUCTION:Home care allows children with cancer to lead a life close to normal. Nurses working in oncology have a high flow of patients and provide treatments that could be provided at home. OBJECTIVE:Identify and analyze expectations of nurses and caregivers involved in the "I want to stay at home...come you" project. METHODS:Semi-structured interviews were addressed to oncology nurses and patients followed at the Regina Margherita Children's Hospital in Turin for oncological pathology. The data were analyzed with the content analysis method. RESULTS:The main difficulties for caregivers were transportation(3/8), waiting times(5/8) and sharing a common area(5/8).The main problem for nurses was the frequency of hospital visits (12/12). The home care project responds to the patient's need of normality(4/12) and the operator's need of psycho-physical well-being. DISCUSSION:The themes emerged are topics of current interest in literature. The totality of the caregivers has revealed how important is for children spending much more time at home than in hospital, in order to bring back their life to normality. The critical issues experienced by nurses are: the emotional load linked to the pathology, shiftworks and the company organizational system. CONCLUSIONS:The detection of critical issues in hospital care by patients and nurses highlights how both are aware of which aspects need to be improved to live assistance in hospital structures constructively, implementing home projects
41 kristina.kuznik@gmail.coma poster presentationChild health promotionFebrile convulsion - education of educators, kindergarden health faculty and parents - Project by The Croatian Association for EpilepsyKristina Kužnik, RN, Paediatrics department, UHC "Sestre milosrdnice",kristina.kuznik@gmail.com, Zagreb, Croatia Maša Malenica, Prof.dr.sc., Paediatrics department, UHC "Sestre milosrdnice",malenicamasa96@gmail.com, Zagreb, Croatia Monika Kukuruzović,Dr.sc., Paediatrics department, UHC "Sestre milosrdnice",monikakukuruzovic@gmail.com, Zagreb, CroatiaINTRODUCTION The Croatian Association for Epilepsy in cooperation with the Paediatric Department of Pediatric Neurology and Epileptology of UHC “Sestre milosrdnice” together with the City Office for Health and the City Office for Education of the City of Zagreb is conducting a project on the subject of "Febrile convulsion - education of educators, expert team and parents" in the period from 01.06.2018 to 01.06.2020. In accordance with the national strategy and programs of continuous education, educators of the kindergarten children and health care managers are being educated on the topic of convulsions. OBJECTIVES Show with the project the model of good team work between all of participants in care for child suffering from febrile convulsions, through education for parents, educators and kindergarten health faculty. METHODS 400 participants from the Kindergartens of City of Zagreb participated in the project, out of which there were 60 health care mangaers and 340 educators, all working age groups. The education was conducted in 15 workshops, lasting for 90 minutes, with 25 participants in each workshop. In the first 45 minutes the neuropaediatritican held the presentation about febrile convulsion as an ilness. For the other 45 minutes the nurse had demostrated, using a doll model, how to lower the high body temperature and how to give emergency medical treatment to child suffering from febrile convulsioun. During the presentation each participant is given a brouchure with illustrations as to better understand the topic of the education. RESULTS By direct oral evaluation of the completed workshops (10 workshops), 215 participants know what febrile convulsions are, how to recognize them, what their cause is and how to treat them. Participants also know how to differenciate between febrile convulsions and epilepsy. CONCLUSION The participants were satisfied with the information and education received, shared with the educators examples from everyday practice, and education was conducted on these examples and discussions and prejudices were discussed. Finally, parents and children are calmer knowing that educators are educated in these very dramatic situations.
42 roberta.guardione@unito.itno preference, either oneNeonatal careNurse and Moral Distress in NICU: An Italian StudyRoberta Guardione,MSN,RN,NICU, A.O.U. Città della Salute e della Scienza di Torino, roberta.guardione@unito.it, Italy. Mattia Luciano, MSN,RN,NICU, A.O.U. Città della Salute e della Scienza di Torino, mattia.luciano@unito.it, Italy. Pasquale Di Maio, MSN,RN, A.O.U. Città della Salute e della Scienza di Torino, pasquale.dimaio@unito.it, Italy.Introduction Moral Distress (MD) is a psychological disorder that occurs when healthcare professionals are aware of what is the right decision to make but they cannot make it due to external reasons. MD is associated with staff turnover and to professionals’ health problems, feelings of frustration, anger and sense of guilt. Aim To evaluate the frequency and intesity of MD among nurses working in Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICU) , as well as to investigate potential associations between MD level and professionals’ features. Methods The survey was conducted in four Italian NICUs placed in Piedmont. A convenience sample of nurses partecipated in the survey. Frequency, intensity and MD level were evaluated using the Italian version of Moral Distress Scale Neonatal-Pediatric Version (MDSNPV). Socio-demographic data were collected with a questionnaire. Kruskal Wallis test was used for analisys, statistical significance was set at alpha=0.05. Results A total of 86 nurses partecipated in the survey. Most of the partecipants were women. The overall MD intensity mean score was 2.91 (range 0-4) while the overall MD frequency mean score was 2.23 (range 0-4). Significant associations between MD level and lenght of service in NICU (p 0,033) advanced nursing training (p 0,039) and leaving job (p 0.0023) were found. Discussion The clinical items receiving the highest scores for frequency, intensity and MD level concerned the end of life care, resuscitation, initiation of extensive life-saving action, in according to the other studies in the literature. Conclusion The survey contribute to the uderstanding of MD in Italian NICU. The future goal will be to contain MD for psychological and physical wellness of nurses.
43 ana.ramos@ess.ips.pta poster presentationChild health promotionIntramuscular Injection procedure in children for safer care: an integrative reviewAna Ramos, Assistant Professor at Health School of IPS, Doctor in Nursing, ana.ramos@ess.ips.pt, Portugal; Carla Trindade, Lecturer at Health School of IPS, Master in Nursing and Paediatric Nurse in Setubal Hospital Centre, carla.trindade@ess.ips.pt, Portugal; Josefina Lopes, Master in Nursing Master in Nursing and Paediatric Nurse in Setubal Hospital Centre, Josefina.letras.lopes@hotmail.com, Portugal; Marta Castro, Master in Nursing and Paediatric Nurse in Setubal Hospital Centre, marta.is.castro@gmail.com, PortugalIntroduction: The intramuscular injection is one of the more often techniques practiced by nurses. However, the technique differs and needs to be compared with the scientific literature. Nursing education should take that into account to promote knowledge and better and safer care. Objectives: Identify in the literature the peculiarities of the intramuscular injection technique in children. Methods: Integrative review of the literature on electronic platforms, B-on and ResearchGate®, to answer to the question: What is the most correct and safe procedure for giving intramuscular injection to children? Results: 6 articles were analysed; evaluation grids of Joanna Briggs Institute were applied. The results were grouped into four categories: Selection of the needle; local administration; Volume to be administered; Peculiarities for paediatric care. Discussion: The gauge of the needle, the maximum volume to be administered depending on the muscle and the muscle to be selected for intramuscular injection vary according to the age group. Conclusions: Intramuscular injection in paediatric care has divergences in its specificities in different age groups. However more scientific evidence is needed, the results helps to clarify aspects that nurses should be aware and recommendations should be taught in health schools to ensure safety in intramuscular injection in paediatric age.
44 ana.ramos@ess.ips.ptan oral presentationResearch in Children and Young PeopleInfluence of education programs on children's sleep: an integrative reviewCarla Trindade, Lecturer at Health School of IPS and Child Health and Paediatric Specialist Nurse in Setubal Hospital Centre, carla.trindade@ess.ips.pt, Portugal; Ana Ramos, Assistant Professor at Health School of IPS, PhD in Nursing and Child Health and Paediatric Specialist Nurse, ana.ramos@ess.ips.pt, PortugalIntroduction: Sleep is a determinant of health in children but the number of hours of sleep identified each day is less than the recommended. Obtaining tools is essential to develop a specific intervention to prevent sleep deprivation in children. Objectives: To identify in the literature the influence of educational sleep programs on the sleep of children. Methods: Integrative review study, through research in the Pubmed® database and in the database aggregator EBSCOhost® to answer the guiding question: What is the influence of educational sleep programs on children´s sleep? Results: The steps of the PRISMA model were followed, meeting the inclusion criteria. 93 articles were selected and, after reading the title and abstract, as well as identifying the answer to the guiding question, the final sample included 8 articles. Discussion: In view of the results of the studies, education programs can be an effective intervention in the sleep of children and should be valued as a strategy to promote healthy sleep in children. Conclusions: Sleep should be seen as a determining factor in the health of children and adolescents, thus making it essential to encourage health professionals to develop, for example, educational programs to address this issue.
45 ana.ramos@ess.ips.ptan oral presentationGlobal Challenges for caring for Children, Young People and FamiliesElderly people in children's voices: the first steps towards intergenerational careAndreia Cerqueira, Assistant Professor at Health School of IPS, PhD in Nursing, andreia.cerqueira@ess.ips.pt, Portugal; Ana Lúcia Ramos, Assistant Professor at the Health School of IPS, PhD in Nursing and Child Health and Paediatric Specialist Nurse, ana.ramos@ess.ips.pt, PortugalIntroduction: According to Universal Declaration of Human Rights, it is crucial to prepare child for an individual life in society based on values like dignity, tolerance and solidarity. Given the global trend of aging countries it is important to know the children´s perceptions about aging. Objectives: Collect children's perceptions of the elderly and aging and promote reflection among nursing students about intergenerational care. Methods: The students were invited to ask a child “What does it mean for you to grow old and/to be old? These speeches were presented respecting ethical principles. Results: The children's speeches were analyzed from the perspective of child development and social representations. Students reflected on nurse’s role face of intervention with children and elderly people. Discussion: It was identified positive and less positive perceptions about aging, as well as established links with relevant topics, which deserve further study. Conclusions: The aging of the population is a fact and that should be worked with children, involving them, increasing their sensitivity and bringing together generations whose coexistence could bring many benefits. Working these topics with nursing students, promote their reflection and involvement in a global issue, where nurses can become the facilitators of intergenerational care.
46 kaisa0809@gmail.comno preference, either oneChildhood InjuryPediatric Resuscitative Endovascular Balloon Occlusion of the Aorta (REBOA)Kaisa, Jõgi, medical student & nurse, University of Tarty (Faculty of Medicine) & Tartu University Hospital & The Tartu Ambulance Foundation, kaisa0809@gmail.com, EstoniaIntroduction, objectives. Trauma is the leading cause of death among children worldwide. Resuscitative endovascular balloon occlusion of the aorta (REBOA) is a minimally invasive method of hemorrhage control and is becoming more widespread in adult trauma. There are conflicting reports regarding the benefits and dangers of REBOA and its use in pediatric trauma. The purpose of this literature review was to give an up-to-date overview of REBOA use in children. Method. Systematic search was conducted and electronic databases were searched for terms relating to REBOA, pediatric patient, aortic balloon occlusion and trauma. Case reports and retrospective cohort studies pertaining to the use of REBOA in pediatric patients were included. Results. 63 case reports have been published concerning REBOA use in pediatric patients. The youngest patient was 11-year old boy with traumatic hemorrhagic shock. Discussion. The use of REBOA in pediatric patients is rare but gradually increasing. Only a few reports of REBOA use in children have been published and they are limited by a small sample size. There are many concerns regarding children`s hemodynamic response to aortic occlusion and inflation volumes of the occluding balloon. Another issue with REBOA use in children is the smaller aortic diameter in comparison to adults. Conclusion. REBOA may be a reasonable option for temporary hemodynamic stabilization in seriously injured children in the appropriate clinical setting. However, further research in needed to provide evidence of the effectiveness and safety of REBOA in children.
47 biljananstojanovic@gmail.comno preference, either oneChronic diseases and Complex NeedsDIFFICULTIES IN IMPLEMENTING A GLUTEN FREE DIET FOR CHILDREN WITH CELIAC DISEASE, CAUSED BY THE SOCIOECONOMIC STATUS OF THEIR FAMILIES IN SERBIABiljana N. Stojanović, Professor, Academy of Applied Studies Belgrade, departrment School of applied health Science Studies, Belgrade,Serbia.biljananstojanovic@gmail.com Stevan S. Jovanović, Lecturer, Academy of Applied Studies Belgrade, departrment School of applied health Science Studies, Belgrade,Serbia.biljananstojanovic@gmail.com Mira N. Smuđa, Lecturer, Academy of Applied Studies Belgrade, departrment School of applied health Science Studies, Belgrade,Serbia. Biljana Vuletić, Professor, Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Kragujevac, Kragujevac, SerbiaObjective. To determine the effects of the socioeconomic characteristics of Serbian families with coeliac children (education level, employment, number of family members, monthly family income) on a gluten-free diet outcomes, as measured by serologic tests (tTG). Methods. The sample included 116 parents and the same number of children and adolescents (N = 116) diagnosed with the coeliac disease who had followed a gluten-free diet for at least a year. Children were aged 5-18 years. The research was carried out at the University Children's Hospital in Belgrade and the Institute of Mother and Child Health "Dr Vukan Čupić" in Belgrade. The research was conducted during the period April-December 2016. The instruments used in the research were the Socioeconomic Survey Questionnaire and the Documentation Sheet, both specially designed for the purpose of this study. Results. The results of our study have shown that the mean age of mothers was 39.6 years and fathers 43.4 years. Parent respondents reported completed secondary education in 58% (116) of all cases. 46.55% of mothers and 35.34% fathers of the examined children with coeliac disease were not permanently employed. 82.76% of parents were married. Four-member families were most common. Considering the specific needs, 51% of the parents perceived their income level as very low and low. Serologic tests confirmed the efficacy of the therapy in 25.86% (30/116) of the children. Conclusion. The poor success of a gluten-free diet in the coeliac children and adolescents pointed out to the major impact of a lower socioeconomic status of their families. Taking into account all the difficulties in the implementation of a gluten-free dietary restrictions for children in Serbia, it becomes clear that the engagement of the whole society, and not just the members of their families, is necessary.
48 biljananstojanovic@gmail.coman oral presentationEthical issues in children and young peopleETHICAL DILEMMAS IN NURSING RESEARCH WITH CHILDREN'S PARTICIPATIONBiljana Stojanović Jovanović, Stevan Jovanović, Divna KekušNurses are increasingly involved in research, which requires their good understanding of the ethical principles and processes that underlie the research. Except for general principles that clearly define the mandatory prerequisites for successful science, such as: good knowledge of the literature and application of adequate methodology; expressed criticality and exactness in the work and acceptance of responsibility by each individual in the research team for the published results, other ethical principles must also be fully respected. Most of the ethical issues that arise in the field of nursing are mainly focused on the rights of the nursing research participants, or direct issues of patient care. Ethical codes developed by leading care organizations usually focus on increasing the ethical sensitivity or nursing competences. There is a considerable degree of agreement in the literature that in the case of research whose subjects are children and young people, significantly greater caution is needed when it comes to possible ethical problems. The general claim, that children are a vulnerable category of research participants, that requires special attention and protection from possible abuse in research, prevails in the literature. Nurses-researchers must take care that the design of the research enables the active participation of children as research subjects, in accordance with their experience and developmental possibilities. Within the framework of research designs, the child is seen as a competent being whose perspective should be respected, which increases the chance that adults will make decisions. based on the results of the research to be in the best interest of children. The main ethical considerations that should be taken into account after the completion of the research refer to confidentiality, keeping the anonymity of the children as a participants in the research. Children, must not suffer any pressure in the research relationship. Key words: nursing, research, ethical principles, unethical behavior, children.
49 stundziene.rasa@gmail.coma poster presentationPain in childrenNURSES‘ ROLE IN USING NON-PHARMACOLOGICAL METHODS OF POSTOPERATIVE PAIN MANAGEMENT IN CHILDRENDr. Rasa Stundžienė, assistant Medical Faculty of Vilnius University,  Institute of Health Sciences, Department of Nursing stundziene.rasa@gmail.com, LithuaniaThe objective. To analyse the nurses‘ role in using non-pharmacological methods to reduce the postoperative pain in children and to establish what factors are likely to have impact on non-pharmacological methods‘ usage and parents‘ teaching strategies. Methods. In this research we used the questionnaire created by Dr Tarja Pölkki. The survey was carried out in 2016. The patients of pediatric surgery units in one of the hospitals of Vilnius were examined. „Microsoft Office Excel 2007“ and „SPSS 22.0“ statistical softwares were used for data analysis. Results. The arithmetic mean of the worst postoperative pain measured in children using pain intensity rating scales was 5,6 (SD±2,08). Nurses used various non-pharmacological methods of postoperative pain relief but physical means like regulation of the temperature or massage were used very occasionally, while transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) was never used at all. Two thirds of nurses (62,9 %) „always“ or „almost always“ teach children‘s parents about non-pharmacological methods of the pain relief and only 3,4 % of nurses never educate parents about their child‘s pain management. The major part of nursing staff (80,9 %) noted that they “always” or “almost always” try to have a talk with worried parents about their child’s postoperative period. The most frequent factors which had an impact on nurses in using non-pharmacological methods were a wish to improve their work experience, their knowledge and parents‘ involvement in their child‘s postoperative pain care while heavy workloads and a huge number of patients had a negative impact on using non-pharmacological means. Conclusions. The most frequent non-pharmacological methods of postoperative pain relief used by nurses were the information giving, positioning patients in bed, helping them with daily needs and comforting worried children. Physical means to reduce postoperative pain in children were used rarely. Nurses commonly teach children‘s parents to change their body position, to spend more time with their child, to help with their child‘s daily needs and to draw the attention away from the pain. It was noticed that nurses aged from 45 to 59 years old, with a higher academic degree, raising at least one child by themselves or having a longer work experience more actively participated in the management of postoperative pain relief in children and in their parents‘ teaching.
50 ayakca@ku.edu.tran oral presentationChild health promotionEVALUATION ON THE EFFECT OF EDUCATIONAL PRACTICE WITH CARTOONS ON DISEASE MANAGEMENT IN CHILDREN WITH ASTHMA: A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED STUDYAYLİN AKÇA SÜMENGEN AYŞE FERDA OCAKÇIObjective: The aim of this study is to determine the effect of the education program (HPPCA - Health Promotion Program for Children with Asthma), which was developed by using cartoons and comic based on the health promotion model and brain-based learning theories, on disease control and life quality in children with asthma. Materials and Methods: The sample of the study consisted of 74 children between the ages of 7 and 11 in Istanbul. Children were randomly assigned to the experimental and control groups. After the HPPCA education administered only to the experimental group, both groups were administered two post-tests as a follow-up in the 1st and 3rd months. The data were evaluated using statistical parametric tests. Results: In the study, the asthma control and quality of life scores of the children included in the experimental group in the follow-ups were found to be significantly higher compared to the control group (p<.05). The rate of absenteeism decreased significantly in children, who received HPPCA education, at the first follow-up compared to the children, who did not receive the education (p<.05). Practice Implications: In the present study, it can be argued that the HPPCA education, which was designed based on a model aimed at promoting health and supported by cartoons in a way to attract the attention of children, was effective. HPPCA was proven to create a sense of control over asthma and to improve the quality of life in children.
51 annenils@rm.dkno preference, either oneAdolescents' healthcareHearing the voices of children and young peopleAnne Marie Ryberg, Project Nurse, Aarhus University Hospital, annenils@rm.dk, Denmark Pia Nielsen, MHH, RN, Staff Development Nurse, Aarhus University Hospital, piabonni@rm.dk, Denmark Karen Sønderby Graarup, RN, Aarhus University Hospital, karegraa@rm.dk, Denmark Katrine Ingeman, Ph.d.stud. Aarhus University Hospital, Katrine.ingemann.beck@auh.rm.dk, Denmark Mette Ramskov Thellefsen, RN, Rigshospitalet. mette.ramskov.thellefsen@regionh.dk, Denmark Claus Sixtus-Jensen, Clinical Nurse Specialist and Postdoctoral researcher, Aarhus University Hospital, claus.sixtus@skejby.rm.dk, DenmarkIntroduction The focus of patient-reported experience measures (PREM) has been on adult patients although a considerable number of children and young people are hospitalised. Healthcare systems in both Denmark and abroad are focused on meeting and acknowledging the needs of children and young people. According to the UN Children’s Rights Convention, children have the right to be heard and to exercise their freedom of speech. The voice of this patient group is important to have a welcoming, safe and dynamic healthcare system with improved quality for children and young people. There is a lack of tools enabling children and young people in an outpatient clinic to express their unique knowledge and experiences with the healthcare system. Objectives To translate and validate PREM developed at Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children into Danish and adapt it to a Danish context to give a voice to children and young people. Methods The translation process will follow the recommendations by WHO with forward translation, expert panel evaluation, back translation, pre-testing and cognitive interviewing of 23 children and young people. Results We are currently analysing the interview data. Discussion The voice of children and young people are important and PREM will contribute with new knowledge and identify efforts to improve the quality of services to outpatient children and young people. Conclusions The final conclusion will be available before the conference.
52 chiara.zangari0@gmail.coman oral presentationNursing education and leadershipSimulation as a learning strategy for nursing studentsChiara Zangari, Student, University of Rome Tor Vergata, chiara.zangari0@gmail.com, Italy Andrea Gazzelloni, School of Nursing Lecturer, Bambino Gesù Children's Hospital, andrea.gazzelloni@opbg.net, Italy Giuliana D'Elpidio, School of Nursing Director, Bambino Gesù Children's Hospital, giuliana.delpidio@opbg.net, Italy Luisa Cirulli, Emergency Department Nursing Coordinator, Bambino Gesù Children's Hospital, luisa.cirulli@opbg.net, ItalyIntroduction. Nursing simulation is a learning strategy that allows students to anticipate or amplify real situations with guided experiences, and to gain technical skills, develop critical thinking as well as clinical judgment. Objectives. Evaluate simulation as an effective and valid teaching tool for nursing students. Methods. A narrative literature review was conducted to investigate its educational characteristics. Results. 18 articles were selected to explore psychological aspect of simulation, multidisciplinary team collaboration, the role of briefing/debriefing, high vs low fidelity simulation, and the role of tutor. Discussion. Simulation offers students opportunities to learn technical skills, gain confidence in nursing procedures and organize their work. It also helps students not only to use critical thinking, develop problem solving and decision-making skills in complex situations but also to manage and recognize their emotions. Furthermore, students can learn both multidisciplinary collaboration and teamwork. Finally, debriefing represents the experiential learning moment where students could be enriched with a new experience. Conclusions. Simulation can be considered a valid strategy for improving nursing practice especially to reduce the numerous and increasingly declared clinical errors in healthcare due to the human factor. For this reason, universities should offer nursing students a training path that includes simulation.
53 andrea.gazzelloni@opbg.netan oral presentationNursing education and leadershipNursing students’ learning situations during Covid-19. A cross-sectional survey in Rome (Italy)Andrea Gazzelloni, lecturer, Bambino Gesù Children's Hospital, andrea.gazzelloni@opbg.net, Italy Valentina Pizziconi, lecturer, Bambino Gesù Children's Hospital, valentina.pizziconi@opbg.net, Italy Giuliana D'Elpidio, Director of Nursing School, Bambino Gesù Children's Hospital, giuliana.delpidio@opbg.net, ItalyIntroduction. Covid-19 has dramatically changed all aspects of human life. Impact on health care professionals is currently very important and nursing field is extremely affected in both clinical and educational aspects. Nursing education had to move rapidly to Distance Learning Classes (DLCs). Objectives. To determine nursing students’ evaluation of their learning situations during Covid-19. Methods. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 2nd and 3rd year nursing degree students in Rome. Results. 436 students were involved, 81.65% females and 18.35% males, mean age 22.80 years (SD4.30), and the 2nd and 3rd year degree students were respectively 47.81% and 52.19%. On a 0-10 scale, students declared to be worried about pandemic 7.60 (SD1.72), 75.46% had at least a Covid-19 test and 8.51% was positive. 53.90% of them attended hospital training (3.40% in Covid-19 Unit) and only 56.60% felt safe. During pandemic, students attended DLCs (96.79%) and, on a 0-10 scale, evaluated them 5.46 (SD2.23). Only some of them would suggest DLCs (40.61%) and would attend them after pandemic (46.33%). Finally, on a 0-10 scale, students declared to be worried about their education, 7.94 (SD2.29). Discussion. Hospital training was difficult, and many students felt at risk. DLCs were not well evaluated by students. Conclusions. Pandemic has affected nursing degree students’ progression. DLCs should be implemented to offer a valid pedagogical contribution also to undergraduate nursing programs.
54 johanna.kraas@gmail.coma poster presentationGlobal Challenges for caring for Children, Young People and FamiliesInformation needs of parents of children with primary diagnosis of hearing loss – a qualitative studyJohanna Kraas, Master’s student, Department of Nursing Science, Institute of Family Medicine and Public Health, University of Tartu, johanna.kraas@gmail.com, Estonia Janne Kommusaar, Assistant of Nursing Science, Department of Nursing Science, Institute of Family Medicine and Public Health, University of Tartu, janne.kommusaar@ut.ee, EstoniaIntroduction: Parents awareness about hearing loss helps to ensure the well-being of the child. The information needs of parents of children with primary diagnosis of hearing loss have not been studied in Estonia and studies carried out in other countries may not be applicable because of the differences in health care systems and cultural context. Objectives: The aim of this study was to describe the information needs of parents of children with primary diagnosis of hearing loss. Methods: Individual semi-structured interviews were conducted with 8 parents of children with a primary diagnosis of hearing loss in 11.2019-03.2020. Thematic content analysis was used to analyse the data. Results: Parents needed information about the type, level, cause and prognosis of the hearing loss. They wished to obtain information from healthcare specialists and to receive peer support. Parents wanted to obtain information via e-mail, over the phone, from digital health records, Facebook, Internet, hospital intranet and information leaflets. Discussion and Conclusions: Similar to our results, previous studies have shown that parents of children with a primary diagnosis of hearing loss need more information about the condition. Information should be given by a specialist who is competent to do it. Parents may also need emotional support and therefore should be informed about the opportunity to turn to a psychologist and to get peer support.
55 berzina.anna@gmail.coman oral presentationInfectious diseasesSkin microbiomeAnna Bērziņa, dermatologist, Clinic of Laserplastics, berzina.anna@gmail.com, Riga, Latvia• Introduction Skin microbiome is an invisible ecosystem of living microorganisms that is an integral part of the surface of the skin. Its balance is essential to our skin health. • Objectives There are skin conditions like atopic dermatitis, acne, psoriasis and eczema, when skin microbiome is less abundant, causing life quality degradation both in kids and adults. • Methods The first microbes have been described in mid-1600s, following the research in 1800s finding the connection between microbes and diseases. DNA sequencing becomes available in 1900s, allowing the studying of microbes that cannot be cultured. The scientific work continues in the 21st century. • Results In healthy skin, the microbiome protects from pathogens and is an actor of the immune response. Clear disruption of microbial balance is linked to inappropriate immune response and the skin symptoms are proven scientifically. Missing function of the skin microbiota is responsible for the development of exacerbated skin inflammation. • Discussion The functional role played by the skin microbiome is now well established. These microorganisms aren't just bystanders when it comes to our skin health, they play a major role. Studies have shown that the microbiome has multiple functions: it regulates, affects our immune and inflammatory systems, interacts with skin cells, protects and repairs. • Conclusions The skin microbiome is key to the health of our skin, as it can perform multiple functions and interact with our skin in various ways.
56 dmantziou@gmail.coma poster presentationPaediatric Critical and Intensive careLife and health quality of nurses in pediatric and adults’ ICUs.Theodora Mantziou, Nurse G.H Genimmatas Thessaloniki, dmantziou@gmail.com,Grecce.Pantelis Perdikaris, As. Professor of Nursing, Univ. of Peloponnese,perdik@uop.gr,Grecce. Margarita Giannakopoulou, Professor. of Nursing, National Kapodistrian Univ. of Athens,mgiannak@nurs.uoa.gr,Grecce. Dafni Kaitelidou, As. Professor. of Nursing, National Kapodistrian Univ. of Athens,dkaitelid@nurs.uoa.gr,Grecce.Varvara Mpoutopoulou, Nurse, Avademic fellow,bmpoutopoulou@gmail.com,Grecce. Vasiliki Matziou, Professor. of Nursing, National Kapodistrian Univ. of Athens, vmatziou@nurs.uoa.gr,Grecce.Introduction: Nurses’ professional satisfaction determines the quality of their professional life and affects their health status Objectives: Assessment of the nurses' professional satisfaction in ICUs of Greek public hospitals and its correlation with their quality of life and health Methods: Quantitative methodology with questionnaires (GHQ-28,IWS) Results: Statistically significant correlations: Social dysfunction with mean working time on weekends (rho=0.216,p=0.03,the latter with severe depression (rho=0.20,p=0.038) Negative correlations: Work satisfaction- general health (rho=-0.217,p=0.008), anxiety/insomnia (rho=-0.261,p=0.001) and social dysfunction (rho=-0.249,p=0.002) Statistically significant demographic factors: Family status on social dysfunction (H=7.223, p=0.049), clinic on anxiety/insomnia (U=1842,z=-2.141,p=0.03), on social dysfunction (U=1781.5,z= -2.443, p=0.015),on severe depression (U=1646,z=-3.16,p=0.002) Discussion: Impact of demographic factors on professional quality of life. Differences related to sex. Work satisfaction affects psychological health and social life Conclusions: Weak negative correlation between work satisfaction and general health. Impact of working conditions to psychological status and of demographic factors on professional quality of life. Work satisfaction prevents psychological disorders and social dysfunction